/page/4

voldey:

who did it better?

(Source: honey-mp3, via 221bstarktower)

phoneus:

kind of intense for a Silk commercial

(Source: libulan, via betthearm)

The Glorious Gutter Life: 004 - From Pitch to Page

comics:

The Glorious Gutter Life 

004 - From Pitch to Page

Last week on The Glorious Gutter Life: 003 - How Not to Take It in the Tailpipe (or, Comic Contracts 101)

I’m writing this column as I sit in the barest sliver of sunlight, trying to sneak it in between five other looming deadlines before marlene notices it’s late. Two of those deadlines are comic related. Two are interviews about one of those comics. The other is the baby my wife and I are expecting sometime inside the next three weeks.

So life’s about to get very exciting indeed here at Fort Tapalansky.

Managing deadlines, multiple projects, and real life is a subject for a column wholly its own, but I presume your chief interest right now isn’t The Gutter Life, but rather The Gutters themselves.

We’ll explore The Gutter Life later. You’re here to make comics. 

Over the past few weeks we’ve talked about cutting your ego loose, crafting a successful comic pitch, and negotiating a contract with a publisher. In theory, this means you’re at the vaguely nebulous and always exciting stage where you get to take your pitch and turn it into an actual comic.

The strange and ill-defined part of this process is that you now have to spend time reorganizing your thoughts. The publisher didn’t buy your book based on every detail you’ve labored over and scrawled in your own tears on the floor of your closet (everybody else does that when they’re making stuff up, right? No? Just me? Whatever). In most cases, they’ve based their decision on the sales pitch you created and a few conversations with you. You’ve excitedly negotiated and signed a contract and now you have to make good on your promise.

When this sinks in, you will have two very primal reactions. 

The first is the continuation of your excitement. You are Making It.

The second is the total and complete terror that you will fail.

When you tamp down the second (since it never goes away ever ever ever), and balance the first, your work begins.

image

Read More


Chris Pratt visiting the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Chris Pratt visiting the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

(Source: cappyrogers, via rashidajones)

unconsumption:

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS
Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components: 
Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).
Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  
A full video about the winning project below.

unconsumption:

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS

Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).

Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  

A full video about the winning project below.

(via kenyatta)

mashable:

lothiriel-starr:

And then there’s Thranduil. 

Yep. Sounds about right.

unconsumption:


Researchers at the University of California San Diego have designed an electronic tattoo—a small, flexible circuit board that can be worn just like the Spiderman temp tats I used to stick on my face—that produces an electrical current.
It works by stripping the electrons from lactate, a byproduct of sweat, with an enzyme imprinted on the e-tattoo’s sensor. In other words, it produces power from your nasty workout juice. And, the researchers say, the technology could eventually generate enough electricity to run devices like phones, smart watches, and heart monitors.
"These represent the first examples of epidermal electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cells that could potentially be used for a wide range of future applications," said research lab director Joseph Wang in a statement.

More: This Sweat-Powered E-Tattoo Could One Day Charge Your Phone | The Creators Project

unconsumption:

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have designed an electronic tattoo—a small, flexible circuit board that can be worn just like the Spiderman temp tats I used to stick on my face—that produces an electrical current.

It works by stripping the electrons from lactate, a byproduct of sweat, with an enzyme imprinted on the e-tattoo’s sensor. In other words, it produces power from your nasty workout juice. And, the researchers say, the technology could eventually generate enough electricity to run devices like phones, smart watches, and heart monitors.

"These represent the first examples of epidermal electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cells that could potentially be used for a wide range of future applications," said research lab director Joseph Wang in a statement.

More: This Sweat-Powered E-Tattoo Could One Day Charge Your Phone | The Creators Project

(via betthearm)

gettyimages:

Photographers We’ve Lost In Conflict Zones And Their Work
via @Buzzfeed

James Foley is just the latest photojournalist to be killed while covering the world’s most dangerous wars. Here we look at some of his fellow journalists and their work.

Read the article via @Buzzfeed

Listen to an interview with Getty Images photojournalist Chris Hondros broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’ 

(Photo: A libyan rebel fighter runs up a burning stairwell during an effort to dislodge some ensconced government loyalist troops who were firing on them from an upstairs room during house-to-house fighting on Tripoli Street in downtown Misrata April 20, 2011 in Misrata, Libya. Rebel forces assaulted the downtown positions of troops loyal to Libyan strongman Moammar Gaddafi April 20, briefly forcing them back over a key bridge and trapping several in a building that fought back instead of surrendering, firing on the rebels in the building and seriously wounding two of them during the standoff. Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

gettyimages:

Photographers We’ve Lost In Conflict Zones And Their Work
via @Buzzfeed

James Foley is just the latest photojournalist to be killed while covering the world’s most dangerous wars. Here we look at some of his fellow journalists and their work.

Read the article via @Buzzfeed

Listen to an interview with Getty Images photojournalist Chris Hondros broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’

(Photo: A libyan rebel fighter runs up a burning stairwell during an effort to dislodge some ensconced government loyalist troops who were firing on them from an upstairs room during house-to-house fighting on Tripoli Street in downtown Misrata April 20, 2011 in Misrata, Libya. Rebel forces assaulted the downtown positions of troops loyal to Libyan strongman Moammar Gaddafi April 20, briefly forcing them back over a key bridge and trapping several in a building that fought back instead of surrendering, firing on the rebels in the building and seriously wounding two of them during the standoff. Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

(via betthearm)

Top 10 Picture Books for Activists in Training by Mathangi Subramanian

weneeddiversebooks:

"Fiction can be a tool for imagining realities so perfect that they can never be achieved. Or, it can be a tool to celebrate what we are capable of doing with however little we have been given. This is one idea behind the #Weneeddiversebooks campaign: children of all races, classes, genders, faiths, and geographies commit story-worthy acts of heroism and empathy every day, no matter what their circumstances. Yet, we rarely make space for them on our library shelves."

bobbycaputo:

Man Arrested and Strip Searched After Taking Pictures of NYPD Stop and Frisk Wins $125K in Court

More than two years after being arrested, injured and strip-searched after taking pictures of two NYPD police officers performing a stop and frisk, a Brooklyn man has been awarded a nice legal pay day to the tune of $125K.

According to the lawsuit filed in Brooklyn Federal Court, Dick George was sitting in his parked car in June of 2012 when he saw two policemen in an unmarked car stop and frisk three young African American men. He proceeded to take pictures of and record the incident and, after it was over, went over to the young men and told them to ask for badge numbers in the future.

Unfortunately for George, the police officers heard his comment, and after following him in his car for a short while, pulled him over and proceeded, at least according to the court documents, to do everything a good police officer should not do.

(Continue Reading)

(via betthearm)

voldey:

who did it better?

(Source: honey-mp3, via 221bstarktower)

phoneus:

kind of intense for a Silk commercial

(Source: libulan, via betthearm)

The Glorious Gutter Life: 004 - From Pitch to Page

comics:

The Glorious Gutter Life 

004 - From Pitch to Page

Last week on The Glorious Gutter Life: 003 - How Not to Take It in the Tailpipe (or, Comic Contracts 101)

I’m writing this column as I sit in the barest sliver of sunlight, trying to sneak it in between five other looming deadlines before marlene notices it’s late. Two of those deadlines are comic related. Two are interviews about one of those comics. The other is the baby my wife and I are expecting sometime inside the next three weeks.

So life’s about to get very exciting indeed here at Fort Tapalansky.

Managing deadlines, multiple projects, and real life is a subject for a column wholly its own, but I presume your chief interest right now isn’t The Gutter Life, but rather The Gutters themselves.

We’ll explore The Gutter Life later. You’re here to make comics. 

Over the past few weeks we’ve talked about cutting your ego loose, crafting a successful comic pitch, and negotiating a contract with a publisher. In theory, this means you’re at the vaguely nebulous and always exciting stage where you get to take your pitch and turn it into an actual comic.

The strange and ill-defined part of this process is that you now have to spend time reorganizing your thoughts. The publisher didn’t buy your book based on every detail you’ve labored over and scrawled in your own tears on the floor of your closet (everybody else does that when they’re making stuff up, right? No? Just me? Whatever). In most cases, they’ve based their decision on the sales pitch you created and a few conversations with you. You’ve excitedly negotiated and signed a contract and now you have to make good on your promise.

When this sinks in, you will have two very primal reactions. 

The first is the continuation of your excitement. You are Making It.

The second is the total and complete terror that you will fail.

When you tamp down the second (since it never goes away ever ever ever), and balance the first, your work begins.

image

Read More


Chris Pratt visiting the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Chris Pratt visiting the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

(Source: cappyrogers, via rashidajones)

unconsumption:

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS
Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components: 
Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).
Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  
A full video about the winning project below.

unconsumption:

DIY HAND-CRANK iPHONE CHARGER FROM SCRAP COMPUTER PARTS

Last month, we told you about a fun contest from Sparkfun, all about reusing electronic components:

Build us something, anything! It can be a working piece of circuitry, or a wonderful piece of art, or both! It should be made out of at least 75% reused parts (though we encourage 100%!).

Well, there’s a winner! It’s a DIY hand-crank iPhone charger:

The power source is an AC turntable motor salvaged from a broken microwave. The project enclosure is a reused cardboard shipping tube. And many of the electronic components, such as a USB receptacle, were scrapped from old computer boards.

Read more about it — and other impressive entries in the contest — here.  

A full video about the winning project below.

(via kenyatta)

mashable:

lothiriel-starr:

And then there’s Thranduil. 

Yep. Sounds about right.

unconsumption:


Researchers at the University of California San Diego have designed an electronic tattoo—a small, flexible circuit board that can be worn just like the Spiderman temp tats I used to stick on my face—that produces an electrical current.
It works by stripping the electrons from lactate, a byproduct of sweat, with an enzyme imprinted on the e-tattoo’s sensor. In other words, it produces power from your nasty workout juice. And, the researchers say, the technology could eventually generate enough electricity to run devices like phones, smart watches, and heart monitors.
"These represent the first examples of epidermal electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cells that could potentially be used for a wide range of future applications," said research lab director Joseph Wang in a statement.

More: This Sweat-Powered E-Tattoo Could One Day Charge Your Phone | The Creators Project

unconsumption:

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have designed an electronic tattoo—a small, flexible circuit board that can be worn just like the Spiderman temp tats I used to stick on my face—that produces an electrical current.

It works by stripping the electrons from lactate, a byproduct of sweat, with an enzyme imprinted on the e-tattoo’s sensor. In other words, it produces power from your nasty workout juice. And, the researchers say, the technology could eventually generate enough electricity to run devices like phones, smart watches, and heart monitors.

"These represent the first examples of epidermal electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cells that could potentially be used for a wide range of future applications," said research lab director Joseph Wang in a statement.

More: This Sweat-Powered E-Tattoo Could One Day Charge Your Phone | The Creators Project

(via betthearm)

gettyimages:

Photographers We’ve Lost In Conflict Zones And Their Work
via @Buzzfeed

James Foley is just the latest photojournalist to be killed while covering the world’s most dangerous wars. Here we look at some of his fellow journalists and their work.

Read the article via @Buzzfeed

Listen to an interview with Getty Images photojournalist Chris Hondros broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’ 

(Photo: A libyan rebel fighter runs up a burning stairwell during an effort to dislodge some ensconced government loyalist troops who were firing on them from an upstairs room during house-to-house fighting on Tripoli Street in downtown Misrata April 20, 2011 in Misrata, Libya. Rebel forces assaulted the downtown positions of troops loyal to Libyan strongman Moammar Gaddafi April 20, briefly forcing them back over a key bridge and trapping several in a building that fought back instead of surrendering, firing on the rebels in the building and seriously wounding two of them during the standoff. Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

gettyimages:

Photographers We’ve Lost In Conflict Zones And Their Work
via @Buzzfeed

James Foley is just the latest photojournalist to be killed while covering the world’s most dangerous wars. Here we look at some of his fellow journalists and their work.

Read the article via @Buzzfeed

Listen to an interview with Getty Images photojournalist Chris Hondros broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’

(Photo: A libyan rebel fighter runs up a burning stairwell during an effort to dislodge some ensconced government loyalist troops who were firing on them from an upstairs room during house-to-house fighting on Tripoli Street in downtown Misrata April 20, 2011 in Misrata, Libya. Rebel forces assaulted the downtown positions of troops loyal to Libyan strongman Moammar Gaddafi April 20, briefly forcing them back over a key bridge and trapping several in a building that fought back instead of surrendering, firing on the rebels in the building and seriously wounding two of them during the standoff. Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

(via betthearm)

Top 10 Picture Books for Activists in Training by Mathangi Subramanian

weneeddiversebooks:

"Fiction can be a tool for imagining realities so perfect that they can never be achieved. Or, it can be a tool to celebrate what we are capable of doing with however little we have been given. This is one idea behind the #Weneeddiversebooks campaign: children of all races, classes, genders, faiths, and geographies commit story-worthy acts of heroism and empathy every day, no matter what their circumstances. Yet, we rarely make space for them on our library shelves."

bobbycaputo:

Man Arrested and Strip Searched After Taking Pictures of NYPD Stop and Frisk Wins $125K in Court

More than two years after being arrested, injured and strip-searched after taking pictures of two NYPD police officers performing a stop and frisk, a Brooklyn man has been awarded a nice legal pay day to the tune of $125K.

According to the lawsuit filed in Brooklyn Federal Court, Dick George was sitting in his parked car in June of 2012 when he saw two policemen in an unmarked car stop and frisk three young African American men. He proceeded to take pictures of and record the incident and, after it was over, went over to the young men and told them to ask for badge numbers in the future.

Unfortunately for George, the police officers heard his comment, and after following him in his car for a short while, pulled him over and proceeded, at least according to the court documents, to do everything a good police officer should not do.

(Continue Reading)

(via betthearm)

The Glorious Gutter Life: 004 - From Pitch to Page
"I’m an adult, but not like a real adult"
When I have to spend the whole day reading through a political author’s hate mail

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and am currently writing for Nerdist. I tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

Following:

NPR
Mic
IFC