/tagged/Writing/page/2

teachingliteracy:

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(via dimir-librarian-cait)

ohmachine said: I just wanted to write and say hi. I've been following your blog for a while and think you're pretty cool. Also, I'm another unemployed writer who feels guilty for doing anything with my time other than networking and trying to find a job. It's pretty goddamn frustrating. Good luck with all the things!

Eleanor Catton sets up grant to give writers 'time to read'

This is phenomenal. As a currently unemployed writer, I feel incredible pressure to spend the majority of my days networking, applying for jobs, and doing the freelance work that’s bringing in some money. Picking up a book before I climb into bed at night to just read for pleasure brings up crazy feelings of guilt. 

So does working on my novel. It’s a catch-22. I have all the time. 

Anonymous said: just out of interest what programs do you use for writing? do you ever just write with paper and pen?

I use Pages because it’s what’s on my computer. I also use Notepad or Text Edit a lot because they clean the coding from my work. I also write directly in Gmail and Wordpress sometimes because it’s convenient. 

And yes, I have an entire shelf of one of my many bookshelves that is devoted to blank books I have filled and partially filled.

thomclyma said: How much does proper grammar matter when writing dialog? Does the proper use of "whom" detract from the realism of character if they don't seem to be the kind of person to use it?

I always try to write dialogue colloquially. It hurts my brain to end sentences with prepositions, BUT I do know that it sounds better in a reader’s head.

I am sure there are differing opinions on this however.

dysnopia said: Hi Rachel! Big fan of your blog, so naturally I ran into a problem and thought of you. I was accepted to attend a Fiction Pitch Conference hosted by the New York Writer's Workshop and I was wondering if you've ever heard of it or anything like that. The price to reserve my spot for a 3-day panel is sort of steep ($425) and I don't live in NY so there are additional costs. Can you offer any wisdom or guidance as to whether I should do it? The conference seems legit, but I don't have a clue. Thx!

Hi! Um, I never have the money to do this kind of thing? The only time I get to go to events like this are when someone else pays my way - that’s pretty much why I didn’t go to Comic Con this year. I couldn’t afford it. That said, sometimes these things are great? 

Do any of my writer friends know of this workshop? megsokay maybe? 

I guess I would advise that you add up all the costs associated with this trip today. Immediately. And if it’s more than you can afford, then it’s more than you can afford. There is a lot of opportunity out there for pitch advice and writing help that is free. $425 seems like a lot. 

Sometimes I reverse outline because I have a perverse talent for writing myself into corners. #writing

Sometimes I reverse outline because I have a perverse talent for writing myself into corners. #writing

A short time later the princess killed the fairy. As a result, the fairy was dead.

Why authors lost the book wars long before Amazon’s dustup with Hachette

suricattus:

dduane:

A painful overview.

Wait, someone was pitying the PUBLISHERS?

Ok but see here’s the problem. This article is not actually about margins and how much authors make and how the publishers are the big bad. This article is about the history of publishing IN AMERICA and how European conglomerates own almost all of The Big Five. 

IT DOES NOT ADDRESS THE OVERARCHING PROBLEM WITH AMAZON:

MONOPOLY

I don’t argue that Amazon isn’t a cool company that profits from a consumer culture where we want to buy and waste more every single fucking day. 

The problem is that if Amazon willfully drives other publishing houses out of business then they get to dictate what does and does not get published.

Sure if the guy in charge is a decent human being, we still have a diverse library to choose from.

But what if he’s not? And he’s usually not in the grand scheme of history.

What happens when he’s an asshole who doesn’t like women or doesn’t like black people or really likes torture porn?

What happens when he wants to only publish text books with abstinence lessons instead of sex ed? 

What happens when he thinks creationism is THE way to go and evolution should no longer be taught in school?

He gets to because he’s the only asshole in town with a printing press.

Obviously these are extreme examples but take a second and look past what is basically a “WOE IS AMERICAN PUBLISHING” article. This writer is abhorring businessmen making decisions for an industry that is currently BUCKLING under pressure from a businessman doing EXACTLY the same thing. 

Just because he’s from Seattle and the company is American doesn’t make it better.

bornonthebattleground said: Ok, don't get me wrong because it's just curiosity, but I have to ask: how much of Supernatural is in Demon's Lexicon, if any? Please don't get this wrong, i love your books, it's a great story with great characters (and better storytelling, to be fair). It's just that I started to watch it recently and some similiarities struck me. And because it would be SO great if someone made a tv show out of DL :)

sarahreesbrennan:

Oh, you poor sweetie. Please don’t feel at all self-conscious about asking this question, because it’s totally fine, and I so appreciate you saying you like the books (and I would love to have a TV show!) but this is actually something that comes up a lot. This ask about my books is really nice, which is why I chose it, because people have told me they find hostile asks upsetting. I do myself.

Since this question DOES come up a lot, sometimes in not-so-nice ways, I figured maybe I could use this nice question and write some kind of Ultimate Tumblr Answer to all such questions so I wouldn’t have to answer it again. 

This is going to be kind of a BIG answer and it might feel overwhelming, so check out of it any time after the simple answer, which is:

None. Zero. Zip. Nada.

There is no Supernatural in my books. I promise you.

I have only seen a few episodes of the first season of Supernatural, back maybe six years ago, and I didn’t enjoy it. (Which doesn’t mean that people can’t enjoy it. Many people cooler than me enjoy it. I have a brilliant lady astrophysicist friend who owns all the box sets!) I’m not going to go into why I didn’t enjoy it, because then people will come and argue with me about my judgy ways, and criticise all the stuff like Vampire Diaries and Teen Wolf that I do like. Fair enough, people. Let us all like what we like, accept that we like different things, and everything will be lovely!

I always feel like I have to be careful talking about Supernatural: if any Supernatural fans read the Demon’s Lexicon series and think to themselves, ‘Hey, this contains some of the stuff what I like, i.e. demons and brothers (the only two things TDL and SPN have in common)’ - then fabulous. I want people to read my books, and whatever way they get to my books is wonderful.

But it’s also important to be clear and honest: I would not base a book series on a TV show I never saw much of, and which I didn’t enjoy. That would be a lot of time to devote to stuff I didn’t enjoy! I wouldn’t do it. (Why do people think I would? Well, we’ll get to that later.)

There are a lot of demon stories out there, and a lot of family stories out there, but here are some obvious dissimilarities between Supernatural and the Demon’s Lexicon series:

1. The brothers in Supernatural are actually blood related, while the brothers I wrote about are not blood related. They are not even the same species.

2. One of the brothers in Demon’s Lexicon is disabled.

3. Road-Trip-Through-Small-Town America is a very distinct aesthetic Supernatural seemed to be going for. Can’t be achieved when your setting is England. The magic system itself is rooted in American folklore—mine is totally different.

4. There are ladies in my series who are present in every book and important, whereas I do not believe the Supernatural series has a female lead present in every episode or indeed season.

5. There’s also a queer character present and important in every book, and I do not believe the Supernatural series has a queer character present in every episode. Or indeed season.

6. There are no angels in my world and I understand angels become pretty important in Supernatural. Obviously, they like angels and I like—other stuff.

This has come out seeming judgy of Supernatural after all. I understand that Supernatural now has a queer lady character played by Felicia Day, and that’s excellent. I don’t mean to bag on Supernatural. But it is a very different story to the story in my books, and its creators have very different priorities to me, and I think that’s pretty clear.

There’s something else to be discussed here, which is that people may say unto me: Why’d you write books about brothers and demons if you didn’t want people to think your books were fanfiction, you dumb jerk?

I have two answers to that.

1) I can write what I like and I think it’s gross to say that I can’t.

2) It wouldn’t have mattered what I wrote about. Every book I’ve ever written gets this. My books haven’t just been called Supernatural fanfiction. They get called Harry Potter fanfiction, too. Definitely! How would I have the ability to come up with my own characters? 

No, the hero of Demon’s Lexicon is definitely Harry Potter. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was an evil demon, right?) And Unspoken is definitely Harry Potter too. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was a part-Japanese sassy girl detective? As well as being an evil demon. That Harry Potter. Such a multi-faceted individual.) 

My books are also Twilight fanfiction. (What isn’t?) And Full Metal Alchemist fanfiction. Just ceaseless fanfiction. And that means of course that the books are very, very bad.

My books get called fanfiction all the time, I think, for two reasons:

a) I am a girl. Dudes get to write perceived-as-derivative/actually-derivative fiction all the time and it’s a HOMAGE, but girls can’t do either. People decide girls’ stuff is derivative and lousy all the time, whereas boys’ stuff is part of a literary tradition and an important conversation. This is sexist and terrible.

Neil Gaiman referenced Asimov in Neverwhere: 

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/66578815533/my-father-claims-the-line-violence-was-the-last-refuge

And G.K. Chesterton in Coraline:

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/42909304300/my-moms-a-librarian-and-planning-to-put-literary

And William Gibson in Neverwhere:

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2004/12/some-days-bears-on-top.asp

Yet I do not see Neil Gaiman getting chased around and called a plagiarist like I was this summer when I wrote three words which also appear in the Hunger Games! (And before that, as it turns out, in The Emperor’s New Groove. Llamas, sue the Hunger Games!)

I am very tired of seeing women insulted for things every dude in the world is allowed to do. It is not literary critique. It is violent misogyny.

image

b) I used to write fanfiction. (These two issues—sexism and fanfiction—are actually very closely intertwined, because writing fanfiction is something that mostly girls do, and thus like all things Associated With Ladies, such as sewing and pink, is treated as dumb and worthless. And fanfiction, as I’m going to discuss, provides people with a narrative that go ‘why this lady actually sucks’ and people love narratives which say that.)

For those who didn’t know I used to write fanfiction, it’s obviously irrelevant to your opinion of me, and honestly, you can cut out here. Definitely if the person who asked me about Supernatural this time around wants to cut out here… they should. I am about to get mad. It is not your fault. I have just got this too many times, and I have had it up to here.

When someone is traditionally published after writing fanfiction, they get treated like trash, both by people who think fanfiction is weird rubbish and by people who themselves like to write and read fanfiction.

Read More

The internet can be a cold place. Fandom sometimes lends you a blanket and sometimes it rips the blanket apart in front of you and throws it on the flames you’re not allowed to warm your hands at anymore.

teachingliteracy:

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(via dimir-librarian-cait)

ohmachine said: I just wanted to write and say hi. I've been following your blog for a while and think you're pretty cool. Also, I'm another unemployed writer who feels guilty for doing anything with my time other than networking and trying to find a job. It's pretty goddamn frustrating. Good luck with all the things!

Eleanor Catton sets up grant to give writers 'time to read'

This is phenomenal. As a currently unemployed writer, I feel incredible pressure to spend the majority of my days networking, applying for jobs, and doing the freelance work that’s bringing in some money. Picking up a book before I climb into bed at night to just read for pleasure brings up crazy feelings of guilt. 

So does working on my novel. It’s a catch-22. I have all the time. 

Anonymous said: just out of interest what programs do you use for writing? do you ever just write with paper and pen?

I use Pages because it’s what’s on my computer. I also use Notepad or Text Edit a lot because they clean the coding from my work. I also write directly in Gmail and Wordpress sometimes because it’s convenient. 

And yes, I have an entire shelf of one of my many bookshelves that is devoted to blank books I have filled and partially filled.

thomclyma said: How much does proper grammar matter when writing dialog? Does the proper use of "whom" detract from the realism of character if they don't seem to be the kind of person to use it?

I always try to write dialogue colloquially. It hurts my brain to end sentences with prepositions, BUT I do know that it sounds better in a reader’s head.

I am sure there are differing opinions on this however.

dysnopia said: Hi Rachel! Big fan of your blog, so naturally I ran into a problem and thought of you. I was accepted to attend a Fiction Pitch Conference hosted by the New York Writer's Workshop and I was wondering if you've ever heard of it or anything like that. The price to reserve my spot for a 3-day panel is sort of steep ($425) and I don't live in NY so there are additional costs. Can you offer any wisdom or guidance as to whether I should do it? The conference seems legit, but I don't have a clue. Thx!

Hi! Um, I never have the money to do this kind of thing? The only time I get to go to events like this are when someone else pays my way - that’s pretty much why I didn’t go to Comic Con this year. I couldn’t afford it. That said, sometimes these things are great? 

Do any of my writer friends know of this workshop? megsokay maybe? 

I guess I would advise that you add up all the costs associated with this trip today. Immediately. And if it’s more than you can afford, then it’s more than you can afford. There is a lot of opportunity out there for pitch advice and writing help that is free. $425 seems like a lot. 

Sometimes I reverse outline because I have a perverse talent for writing myself into corners. #writing

Sometimes I reverse outline because I have a perverse talent for writing myself into corners. #writing

amandaonwriting:

Writing Prompt – People with no regrets

amandaonwriting:

Writing Prompt – People with no regrets

A short time later the princess killed the fairy. As a result, the fairy was dead.

Why authors lost the book wars long before Amazon’s dustup with Hachette

suricattus:

dduane:

A painful overview.

Wait, someone was pitying the PUBLISHERS?

Ok but see here’s the problem. This article is not actually about margins and how much authors make and how the publishers are the big bad. This article is about the history of publishing IN AMERICA and how European conglomerates own almost all of The Big Five. 

IT DOES NOT ADDRESS THE OVERARCHING PROBLEM WITH AMAZON:

MONOPOLY

I don’t argue that Amazon isn’t a cool company that profits from a consumer culture where we want to buy and waste more every single fucking day. 

The problem is that if Amazon willfully drives other publishing houses out of business then they get to dictate what does and does not get published.

Sure if the guy in charge is a decent human being, we still have a diverse library to choose from.

But what if he’s not? And he’s usually not in the grand scheme of history.

What happens when he’s an asshole who doesn’t like women or doesn’t like black people or really likes torture porn?

What happens when he wants to only publish text books with abstinence lessons instead of sex ed? 

What happens when he thinks creationism is THE way to go and evolution should no longer be taught in school?

He gets to because he’s the only asshole in town with a printing press.

Obviously these are extreme examples but take a second and look past what is basically a “WOE IS AMERICAN PUBLISHING” article. This writer is abhorring businessmen making decisions for an industry that is currently BUCKLING under pressure from a businessman doing EXACTLY the same thing. 

Just because he’s from Seattle and the company is American doesn’t make it better.

bornonthebattleground said: Ok, don't get me wrong because it's just curiosity, but I have to ask: how much of Supernatural is in Demon's Lexicon, if any? Please don't get this wrong, i love your books, it's a great story with great characters (and better storytelling, to be fair). It's just that I started to watch it recently and some similiarities struck me. And because it would be SO great if someone made a tv show out of DL :)

sarahreesbrennan:

Oh, you poor sweetie. Please don’t feel at all self-conscious about asking this question, because it’s totally fine, and I so appreciate you saying you like the books (and I would love to have a TV show!) but this is actually something that comes up a lot. This ask about my books is really nice, which is why I chose it, because people have told me they find hostile asks upsetting. I do myself.

Since this question DOES come up a lot, sometimes in not-so-nice ways, I figured maybe I could use this nice question and write some kind of Ultimate Tumblr Answer to all such questions so I wouldn’t have to answer it again. 

This is going to be kind of a BIG answer and it might feel overwhelming, so check out of it any time after the simple answer, which is:

None. Zero. Zip. Nada.

There is no Supernatural in my books. I promise you.

I have only seen a few episodes of the first season of Supernatural, back maybe six years ago, and I didn’t enjoy it. (Which doesn’t mean that people can’t enjoy it. Many people cooler than me enjoy it. I have a brilliant lady astrophysicist friend who owns all the box sets!) I’m not going to go into why I didn’t enjoy it, because then people will come and argue with me about my judgy ways, and criticise all the stuff like Vampire Diaries and Teen Wolf that I do like. Fair enough, people. Let us all like what we like, accept that we like different things, and everything will be lovely!

I always feel like I have to be careful talking about Supernatural: if any Supernatural fans read the Demon’s Lexicon series and think to themselves, ‘Hey, this contains some of the stuff what I like, i.e. demons and brothers (the only two things TDL and SPN have in common)’ - then fabulous. I want people to read my books, and whatever way they get to my books is wonderful.

But it’s also important to be clear and honest: I would not base a book series on a TV show I never saw much of, and which I didn’t enjoy. That would be a lot of time to devote to stuff I didn’t enjoy! I wouldn’t do it. (Why do people think I would? Well, we’ll get to that later.)

There are a lot of demon stories out there, and a lot of family stories out there, but here are some obvious dissimilarities between Supernatural and the Demon’s Lexicon series:

1. The brothers in Supernatural are actually blood related, while the brothers I wrote about are not blood related. They are not even the same species.

2. One of the brothers in Demon’s Lexicon is disabled.

3. Road-Trip-Through-Small-Town America is a very distinct aesthetic Supernatural seemed to be going for. Can’t be achieved when your setting is England. The magic system itself is rooted in American folklore—mine is totally different.

4. There are ladies in my series who are present in every book and important, whereas I do not believe the Supernatural series has a female lead present in every episode or indeed season.

5. There’s also a queer character present and important in every book, and I do not believe the Supernatural series has a queer character present in every episode. Or indeed season.

6. There are no angels in my world and I understand angels become pretty important in Supernatural. Obviously, they like angels and I like—other stuff.

This has come out seeming judgy of Supernatural after all. I understand that Supernatural now has a queer lady character played by Felicia Day, and that’s excellent. I don’t mean to bag on Supernatural. But it is a very different story to the story in my books, and its creators have very different priorities to me, and I think that’s pretty clear.

There’s something else to be discussed here, which is that people may say unto me: Why’d you write books about brothers and demons if you didn’t want people to think your books were fanfiction, you dumb jerk?

I have two answers to that.

1) I can write what I like and I think it’s gross to say that I can’t.

2) It wouldn’t have mattered what I wrote about. Every book I’ve ever written gets this. My books haven’t just been called Supernatural fanfiction. They get called Harry Potter fanfiction, too. Definitely! How would I have the ability to come up with my own characters? 

No, the hero of Demon’s Lexicon is definitely Harry Potter. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was an evil demon, right?) And Unspoken is definitely Harry Potter too. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was a part-Japanese sassy girl detective? As well as being an evil demon. That Harry Potter. Such a multi-faceted individual.) 

My books are also Twilight fanfiction. (What isn’t?) And Full Metal Alchemist fanfiction. Just ceaseless fanfiction. And that means of course that the books are very, very bad.

My books get called fanfiction all the time, I think, for two reasons:

a) I am a girl. Dudes get to write perceived-as-derivative/actually-derivative fiction all the time and it’s a HOMAGE, but girls can’t do either. People decide girls’ stuff is derivative and lousy all the time, whereas boys’ stuff is part of a literary tradition and an important conversation. This is sexist and terrible.

Neil Gaiman referenced Asimov in Neverwhere: 

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/66578815533/my-father-claims-the-line-violence-was-the-last-refuge

And G.K. Chesterton in Coraline:

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/42909304300/my-moms-a-librarian-and-planning-to-put-literary

And William Gibson in Neverwhere:

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2004/12/some-days-bears-on-top.asp

Yet I do not see Neil Gaiman getting chased around and called a plagiarist like I was this summer when I wrote three words which also appear in the Hunger Games! (And before that, as it turns out, in The Emperor’s New Groove. Llamas, sue the Hunger Games!)

I am very tired of seeing women insulted for things every dude in the world is allowed to do. It is not literary critique. It is violent misogyny.

image

b) I used to write fanfiction. (These two issues—sexism and fanfiction—are actually very closely intertwined, because writing fanfiction is something that mostly girls do, and thus like all things Associated With Ladies, such as sewing and pink, is treated as dumb and worthless. And fanfiction, as I’m going to discuss, provides people with a narrative that go ‘why this lady actually sucks’ and people love narratives which say that.)

For those who didn’t know I used to write fanfiction, it’s obviously irrelevant to your opinion of me, and honestly, you can cut out here. Definitely if the person who asked me about Supernatural this time around wants to cut out here… they should. I am about to get mad. It is not your fault. I have just got this too many times, and I have had it up to here.

When someone is traditionally published after writing fanfiction, they get treated like trash, both by people who think fanfiction is weird rubbish and by people who themselves like to write and read fanfiction.

Read More

The internet can be a cold place. Fandom sometimes lends you a blanket and sometimes it rips the blanket apart in front of you and throws it on the flames you’re not allowed to warm your hands at anymore.

I Love The Big Bang Theory Even If Some Geeks Don't | The Mary Sue

I wrote this. I am resisting reading the comments.

150k words is too many for a manuscript.
"A short time later the princess killed the fairy. As a result, the fairy was dead."

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and am currently writing for Nerdist. I tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

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