/tagged/Writing/page/2

Why authors lost the book wars long before Amazon’s dustup with Hachette

suricattus:

dduane:

A painful overview.

Wait, someone was pitying the PUBLISHERS?

Ok but see here’s the problem. This article is not actually about margins and how much authors make and how the publishers are the big bad. This article is about the history of publishing IN AMERICA and how European conglomerates own almost all of The Big Five. 

IT DOES NOT ADDRESS THE OVERARCHING PROBLEM WITH AMAZON:

MONOPOLY

I don’t argue that Amazon isn’t a cool company that profits from a consumer culture where we want to buy and waste more every single fucking day. 

The problem is that if Amazon willfully drives other publishing houses out of business then they get to dictate what does and does not get published.

Sure if the guy in charge is a decent human being, we still have a diverse library to choose from.

But what if he’s not? And he’s usually not in the grand scheme of history.

What happens when he’s an asshole who doesn’t like women or doesn’t like black people or really likes torture porn?

What happens when he wants to only publish text books with abstinence lessons instead of sex ed? 

What happens when he thinks creationism is THE way to go and evolution should no longer be taught in school?

He gets to because he’s the only asshole in town with a printing press.

Obviously these are extreme examples but take a second and look past what is basically a “WOE IS AMERICAN PUBLISHING” article. This writer is abhorring businessmen making decisions for an industry that is currently BUCKLING under pressure from a businessman doing EXACTLY the same thing. 

Just because he’s from Seattle and the company is American doesn’t make it better.

bornonthebattleground said: Ok, don't get me wrong because it's just curiosity, but I have to ask: how much of Supernatural is in Demon's Lexicon, if any? Please don't get this wrong, i love your books, it's a great story with great characters (and better storytelling, to be fair). It's just that I started to watch it recently and some similiarities struck me. And because it would be SO great if someone made a tv show out of DL :)

sarahreesbrennan:

Oh, you poor sweetie. Please don’t feel at all self-conscious about asking this question, because it’s totally fine, and I so appreciate you saying you like the books (and I would love to have a TV show!) but this is actually something that comes up a lot. This ask about my books is really nice, which is why I chose it, because people have told me they find hostile asks upsetting. I do myself.

Since this question DOES come up a lot, sometimes in not-so-nice ways, I figured maybe I could use this nice question and write some kind of Ultimate Tumblr Answer to all such questions so I wouldn’t have to answer it again. 

This is going to be kind of a BIG answer and it might feel overwhelming, so check out of it any time after the simple answer, which is:

None. Zero. Zip. Nada.

There is no Supernatural in my books. I promise you.

I have only seen a few episodes of the first season of Supernatural, back maybe six years ago, and I didn’t enjoy it. (Which doesn’t mean that people can’t enjoy it. Many people cooler than me enjoy it. I have a brilliant lady astrophysicist friend who owns all the box sets!) I’m not going to go into why I didn’t enjoy it, because then people will come and argue with me about my judgy ways, and criticise all the stuff like Vampire Diaries and Teen Wolf that I do like. Fair enough, people. Let us all like what we like, accept that we like different things, and everything will be lovely!

I always feel like I have to be careful talking about Supernatural: if any Supernatural fans read the Demon’s Lexicon series and think to themselves, ‘Hey, this contains some of the stuff what I like, i.e. demons and brothers (the only two things TDL and SPN have in common)’ - then fabulous. I want people to read my books, and whatever way they get to my books is wonderful.

But it’s also important to be clear and honest: I would not base a book series on a TV show I never saw much of, and which I didn’t enjoy. That would be a lot of time to devote to stuff I didn’t enjoy! I wouldn’t do it. (Why do people think I would? Well, we’ll get to that later.)

There are a lot of demon stories out there, and a lot of family stories out there, but here are some obvious dissimilarities between Supernatural and the Demon’s Lexicon series:

1. The brothers in Supernatural are actually blood related, while the brothers I wrote about are not blood related. They are not even the same species.

2. One of the brothers in Demon’s Lexicon is disabled.

3. Road-Trip-Through-Small-Town America is a very distinct aesthetic Supernatural seemed to be going for. Can’t be achieved when your setting is England. The magic system itself is rooted in American folklore—mine is totally different.

4. There are ladies in my series who are present in every book and important, whereas I do not believe the Supernatural series has a female lead present in every episode or indeed season.

5. There’s also a queer character present and important in every book, and I do not believe the Supernatural series has a queer character present in every episode. Or indeed season.

6. There are no angels in my world and I understand angels become pretty important in Supernatural. Obviously, they like angels and I like—other stuff.

This has come out seeming judgy of Supernatural after all. I understand that Supernatural now has a queer lady character played by Felicia Day, and that’s excellent. I don’t mean to bag on Supernatural. But it is a very different story to the story in my books, and its creators have very different priorities to me, and I think that’s pretty clear.

There’s something else to be discussed here, which is that people may say unto me: Why’d you write books about brothers and demons if you didn’t want people to think your books were fanfiction, you dumb jerk?

I have two answers to that.

1) I can write what I like and I think it’s gross to say that I can’t.

2) It wouldn’t have mattered what I wrote about. Every book I’ve ever written gets this. My books haven’t just been called Supernatural fanfiction. They get called Harry Potter fanfiction, too. Definitely! How would I have the ability to come up with my own characters? 

No, the hero of Demon’s Lexicon is definitely Harry Potter. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was an evil demon, right?) And Unspoken is definitely Harry Potter too. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was a part-Japanese sassy girl detective? As well as being an evil demon. That Harry Potter. Such a multi-faceted individual.) 

My books are also Twilight fanfiction. (What isn’t?) And Full Metal Alchemist fanfiction. Just ceaseless fanfiction. And that means of course that the books are very, very bad.

My books get called fanfiction all the time, I think, for two reasons:

a) I am a girl. Dudes get to write perceived-as-derivative/actually-derivative fiction all the time and it’s a HOMAGE, but girls can’t do either. People decide girls’ stuff is derivative and lousy all the time, whereas boys’ stuff is part of a literary tradition and an important conversation. This is sexist and terrible.

Neil Gaiman referenced Asimov in Neverwhere: 

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/66578815533/my-father-claims-the-line-violence-was-the-last-refuge

And G.K. Chesterton in Coraline:

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/42909304300/my-moms-a-librarian-and-planning-to-put-literary

And William Gibson in Neverwhere:

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2004/12/some-days-bears-on-top.asp

Yet I do not see Neil Gaiman getting chased around and called a plagiarist like I was this summer when I wrote three words which also appear in the Hunger Games! (And before that, as it turns out, in The Emperor’s New Groove. Llamas, sue the Hunger Games!)

I am very tired of seeing women insulted for things every dude in the world is allowed to do. It is not literary critique. It is violent misogyny.

image

b) I used to write fanfiction. (These two issues—sexism and fanfiction—are actually very closely intertwined, because writing fanfiction is something that mostly girls do, and thus like all things Associated With Ladies, such as sewing and pink, is treated as dumb and worthless. And fanfiction, as I’m going to discuss, provides people with a narrative that go ‘why this lady actually sucks’ and people love narratives which say that.)

For those who didn’t know I used to write fanfiction, it’s obviously irrelevant to your opinion of me, and honestly, you can cut out here. Definitely if the person who asked me about Supernatural this time around wants to cut out here… they should. I am about to get mad. It is not your fault. I have just got this too many times, and I have had it up to here.

When someone is traditionally published after writing fanfiction, they get treated like trash, both by people who think fanfiction is weird rubbish and by people who themselves like to write and read fanfiction.

Read More

The internet can be a cold place. Fandom sometimes lends you a blanket and sometimes it rips the blanket apart in front of you and throws it on the flames you’re not allowed to warm your hands at anymore.

Opening the Drawer on an Old Manuscript…again

Opening the Drawer on an Old Manuscript…again

I’m usually the last one to join the party.

Unless it’s a real party. If it’s a real party I am obnoxiously on time.

But I kind of find entertaining things late? I started watching The West Winghalf way through season 7. I don’t go to midnight showings. In fact I usually don’t see things until they are out of theaters. I know what happens in them because of social media and that’s enough for me.…

View On WordPress

You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner. No one is going to write your book for you and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own.
– Cheryl Strayed (via maxkirin)

(via whoinwhoville)

Verklempt & Barrel

Sometimes I write stuff. 

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

This is a thing that I wrote.

It is about mice.

It features a slightly intoxicated appearance by adulthoodisokay

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 11.21.00 PMI recently moved. You may have seen me mention it elsewhere on the internet.

My new apartment is lovely. It’s a one bedroom in a gentrifying neighborhood of Brooklyn and is within walking distance of two of my favorite coffee spots in the borough. What more could I really ask for except the couch I’m really hoping to buy tomorrow? My lovely apartment comes with a small problem though. It’s a…

View On WordPress

Talking To Strangers: Apparently A Thing I Do Now

bookoisseur:

Talking To Strangers: Apparently A Thing I Do Now

ngbbs47dc8e2ae75b7Walking home past Barclays tonight, I passed by a man and two women battling with cardboard tubes. They were roughly my age, maybe a little bit younger, and dressed casually. One girl stood to the side giggling at her friends. The other two had hefted up these cardboard tubes that were discarded beside a construction site and were swinging them at each other.

She dashed forward, raising her sword…

View On WordPress

So my friend lorrainecink is doing this Every Day May thing on her YouTube channel, and I’m going to follow her lead and get my shit together with actual writing and blogging. 

Yes that means you’ll see more of this soon.

Anonymous said: How did you get to where you are? I love to read and write and discuss books and movies and television shows and I don't know how to turn that into something I can be paid for.

I just keep writing.

I have been paid for that persistence one time and one time only.

writersrelief:

Short Story Shortcuts: 4 Techniques For Making A Big Impact In Few Words
To successfully write short fiction, you need to make a big impact in as few words as possible. So every choice you make as an author needs to be deliberate, every character needs to act with purpose, and every word needs to pack a punch. When less is definitely more, focusing on certain details can help imbue your short story with lots of color, meaning, and subtext—without superfluous words.

writersrelief:

Short Story Shortcuts: 4 Techniques For Making A Big Impact In Few Words

To successfully write short fiction, you need to make a big impact in as few words as possible. So every choice you make as an author needs to be deliberate, every character needs to act with purpose, and every word needs to pack a punch. When less is definitely more, focusing on certain details can help imbue your short story with lots of color, meaning, and subtext—without superfluous words.

rachelfershleiser:

I have worked with a public school in Harlem, PS 123, for about a decade now, and have recently started a new project with them focused on “student voice.” The goal is to bring in writers, artists, photographers and other creative professionals to show kids unique ways to find and express their voices. (via Helping Kids Find Their Voices as Writers)

Thanks for having me Dan. Such am amazing group of kids!

rachelfershleiser:

I have worked with a public school in Harlem, PS 123, for about a decade now, and have recently started a new project with them focused on “student voice.” The goal is to bring in writers, artists, photographers and other creative professionals to show kids unique ways to find and express their voices. (via Helping Kids Find Their Voices as Writers)

Thanks for having me Dan. Such am amazing group of kids!

theparisreview:

“The traveling charge, moving with the swiftness of a pen or brush, creates the eloquent impression of writing: full of drama, force, destruction, and creation.”Lilly Lampe on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Ink Art” exhibition and the beauty of meaningless writing.

theparisreview:

“The traveling charge, moving with the swiftness of a pen or brush, creates the eloquent impression of writing: full of drama, force, destruction, and creation.”

Lilly Lampe on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Ink Art” exhibition and the beauty of meaningless writing.

eatdrinkdie:

Old box fans and rotted boards balanced against the rock wall. I was visiting the neighborhood where I grew up and I slowed to a stop in front of a huge pile of trash. Years of useless garbage in front of a house where I played and ate, sometimes fought with fists, and set the small brush fires of youth. A woman lived in that house and she was the boss. She was in charge. The meals she made every day were magnificent and voluminous, especially on Sundays. Braciola. Tough cuts of beef pounded flat, rolled with slices of hardboiled egg and herbs and braised for hours. The meat drippings mingled with tomato and tasted faintly of metal. I remember the time a bread knife flew across the kitchen from the hand of one brother, aimed at the back of another. I remembered chaos and noise, a door that was always open in winter or in summer. I sat in my car and remembered how that small woman began to shrink. She hunched at the shoulders, struggling not to tip under the weight of her laundry basket. She finally started kicking it down the long hallway. I remembered years passing and the disease twisting her fingers and toes into knots. One day she couldn’t talk anymore. The woman was frozen like stone and looked like she was crying all the time. She’s laughing her children said, but it didn’t look like that to me. I remember especially the way her husband, dead now too, cared for her in those last years when she couldn’t get up from her hospital bed in a spare room off the kitchen. The sadness in his eyes at church where he prayed alone. I looked at that bed, tipped on its side and stripped down to metal links, rusting in the springtime thaw.  [Painting: Flood Plain by American painter Andrew Wyeth, 1986]

Well, I just cried at work.

eatdrinkdie:

Old box fans and rotted boards balanced against the rock wall. I was visiting the neighborhood where I grew up and I slowed to a stop in front of a huge pile of trash. Years of useless garbage in front of a house where I played and ate, sometimes fought with fists, and set the small brush fires of youth. A woman lived in that house and she was the boss. She was in charge. The meals she made every day were magnificent and voluminous, especially on Sundays. Braciola. Tough cuts of beef pounded flat, rolled with slices of hardboiled egg and herbs and braised for hours. The meat drippings mingled with tomato and tasted faintly of metal. I remember the time a bread knife flew across the kitchen from the hand of one brother, aimed at the back of another. I remembered chaos and noise, a door that was always open in winter or in summer. I sat in my car and remembered how that small woman began to shrink. She hunched at the shoulders, struggling not to tip under the weight of her laundry basket. She finally started kicking it down the long hallway. I remembered years passing and the disease twisting her fingers and toes into knots. One day she couldn’t talk anymore. The woman was frozen like stone and looked like she was crying all the time. She’s laughing her children said, but it didn’t look like that to me. I remember especially the way her husband, dead now too, cared for her in those last years when she couldn’t get up from her hospital bed in a spare room off the kitchen. The sadness in his eyes at church where he prayed alone. I looked at that bed, tipped on its side and stripped down to metal links, rusting in the springtime thaw.

[Painting: Flood Plain by American painter Andrew Wyeth, 1986]

Well, I just cried at work.

Why authors lost the book wars long before Amazon’s dustup with Hachette

suricattus:

dduane:

A painful overview.

Wait, someone was pitying the PUBLISHERS?

Ok but see here’s the problem. This article is not actually about margins and how much authors make and how the publishers are the big bad. This article is about the history of publishing IN AMERICA and how European conglomerates own almost all of The Big Five. 

IT DOES NOT ADDRESS THE OVERARCHING PROBLEM WITH AMAZON:

MONOPOLY

I don’t argue that Amazon isn’t a cool company that profits from a consumer culture where we want to buy and waste more every single fucking day. 

The problem is that if Amazon willfully drives other publishing houses out of business then they get to dictate what does and does not get published.

Sure if the guy in charge is a decent human being, we still have a diverse library to choose from.

But what if he’s not? And he’s usually not in the grand scheme of history.

What happens when he’s an asshole who doesn’t like women or doesn’t like black people or really likes torture porn?

What happens when he wants to only publish text books with abstinence lessons instead of sex ed? 

What happens when he thinks creationism is THE way to go and evolution should no longer be taught in school?

He gets to because he’s the only asshole in town with a printing press.

Obviously these are extreme examples but take a second and look past what is basically a “WOE IS AMERICAN PUBLISHING” article. This writer is abhorring businessmen making decisions for an industry that is currently BUCKLING under pressure from a businessman doing EXACTLY the same thing. 

Just because he’s from Seattle and the company is American doesn’t make it better.

bornonthebattleground said: Ok, don't get me wrong because it's just curiosity, but I have to ask: how much of Supernatural is in Demon's Lexicon, if any? Please don't get this wrong, i love your books, it's a great story with great characters (and better storytelling, to be fair). It's just that I started to watch it recently and some similiarities struck me. And because it would be SO great if someone made a tv show out of DL :)

sarahreesbrennan:

Oh, you poor sweetie. Please don’t feel at all self-conscious about asking this question, because it’s totally fine, and I so appreciate you saying you like the books (and I would love to have a TV show!) but this is actually something that comes up a lot. This ask about my books is really nice, which is why I chose it, because people have told me they find hostile asks upsetting. I do myself.

Since this question DOES come up a lot, sometimes in not-so-nice ways, I figured maybe I could use this nice question and write some kind of Ultimate Tumblr Answer to all such questions so I wouldn’t have to answer it again. 

This is going to be kind of a BIG answer and it might feel overwhelming, so check out of it any time after the simple answer, which is:

None. Zero. Zip. Nada.

There is no Supernatural in my books. I promise you.

I have only seen a few episodes of the first season of Supernatural, back maybe six years ago, and I didn’t enjoy it. (Which doesn’t mean that people can’t enjoy it. Many people cooler than me enjoy it. I have a brilliant lady astrophysicist friend who owns all the box sets!) I’m not going to go into why I didn’t enjoy it, because then people will come and argue with me about my judgy ways, and criticise all the stuff like Vampire Diaries and Teen Wolf that I do like. Fair enough, people. Let us all like what we like, accept that we like different things, and everything will be lovely!

I always feel like I have to be careful talking about Supernatural: if any Supernatural fans read the Demon’s Lexicon series and think to themselves, ‘Hey, this contains some of the stuff what I like, i.e. demons and brothers (the only two things TDL and SPN have in common)’ - then fabulous. I want people to read my books, and whatever way they get to my books is wonderful.

But it’s also important to be clear and honest: I would not base a book series on a TV show I never saw much of, and which I didn’t enjoy. That would be a lot of time to devote to stuff I didn’t enjoy! I wouldn’t do it. (Why do people think I would? Well, we’ll get to that later.)

There are a lot of demon stories out there, and a lot of family stories out there, but here are some obvious dissimilarities between Supernatural and the Demon’s Lexicon series:

1. The brothers in Supernatural are actually blood related, while the brothers I wrote about are not blood related. They are not even the same species.

2. One of the brothers in Demon’s Lexicon is disabled.

3. Road-Trip-Through-Small-Town America is a very distinct aesthetic Supernatural seemed to be going for. Can’t be achieved when your setting is England. The magic system itself is rooted in American folklore—mine is totally different.

4. There are ladies in my series who are present in every book and important, whereas I do not believe the Supernatural series has a female lead present in every episode or indeed season.

5. There’s also a queer character present and important in every book, and I do not believe the Supernatural series has a queer character present in every episode. Or indeed season.

6. There are no angels in my world and I understand angels become pretty important in Supernatural. Obviously, they like angels and I like—other stuff.

This has come out seeming judgy of Supernatural after all. I understand that Supernatural now has a queer lady character played by Felicia Day, and that’s excellent. I don’t mean to bag on Supernatural. But it is a very different story to the story in my books, and its creators have very different priorities to me, and I think that’s pretty clear.

There’s something else to be discussed here, which is that people may say unto me: Why’d you write books about brothers and demons if you didn’t want people to think your books were fanfiction, you dumb jerk?

I have two answers to that.

1) I can write what I like and I think it’s gross to say that I can’t.

2) It wouldn’t have mattered what I wrote about. Every book I’ve ever written gets this. My books haven’t just been called Supernatural fanfiction. They get called Harry Potter fanfiction, too. Definitely! How would I have the ability to come up with my own characters? 

No, the hero of Demon’s Lexicon is definitely Harry Potter. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was an evil demon, right?) And Unspoken is definitely Harry Potter too. (Y’all remember that Harry Potter was a part-Japanese sassy girl detective? As well as being an evil demon. That Harry Potter. Such a multi-faceted individual.) 

My books are also Twilight fanfiction. (What isn’t?) And Full Metal Alchemist fanfiction. Just ceaseless fanfiction. And that means of course that the books are very, very bad.

My books get called fanfiction all the time, I think, for two reasons:

a) I am a girl. Dudes get to write perceived-as-derivative/actually-derivative fiction all the time and it’s a HOMAGE, but girls can’t do either. People decide girls’ stuff is derivative and lousy all the time, whereas boys’ stuff is part of a literary tradition and an important conversation. This is sexist and terrible.

Neil Gaiman referenced Asimov in Neverwhere: 

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/66578815533/my-father-claims-the-line-violence-was-the-last-refuge

And G.K. Chesterton in Coraline:

http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/42909304300/my-moms-a-librarian-and-planning-to-put-literary

And William Gibson in Neverwhere:

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2004/12/some-days-bears-on-top.asp

Yet I do not see Neil Gaiman getting chased around and called a plagiarist like I was this summer when I wrote three words which also appear in the Hunger Games! (And before that, as it turns out, in The Emperor’s New Groove. Llamas, sue the Hunger Games!)

I am very tired of seeing women insulted for things every dude in the world is allowed to do. It is not literary critique. It is violent misogyny.

image

b) I used to write fanfiction. (These two issues—sexism and fanfiction—are actually very closely intertwined, because writing fanfiction is something that mostly girls do, and thus like all things Associated With Ladies, such as sewing and pink, is treated as dumb and worthless. And fanfiction, as I’m going to discuss, provides people with a narrative that go ‘why this lady actually sucks’ and people love narratives which say that.)

For those who didn’t know I used to write fanfiction, it’s obviously irrelevant to your opinion of me, and honestly, you can cut out here. Definitely if the person who asked me about Supernatural this time around wants to cut out here… they should. I am about to get mad. It is not your fault. I have just got this too many times, and I have had it up to here.

When someone is traditionally published after writing fanfiction, they get treated like trash, both by people who think fanfiction is weird rubbish and by people who themselves like to write and read fanfiction.

Read More

The internet can be a cold place. Fandom sometimes lends you a blanket and sometimes it rips the blanket apart in front of you and throws it on the flames you’re not allowed to warm your hands at anymore.

I Love The Big Bang Theory Even If Some Geeks Don't | The Mary Sue

I wrote this. I am resisting reading the comments.

Opening the Drawer on an Old Manuscript…again

Opening the Drawer on an Old Manuscript…again

I’m usually the last one to join the party.

Unless it’s a real party. If it’s a real party I am obnoxiously on time.

But I kind of find entertaining things late? I started watching The West Winghalf way through season 7. I don’t go to midnight showings. In fact I usually don’t see things until they are out of theaters. I know what happens in them because of social media and that’s enough for me.…

View On WordPress

You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner. No one is going to write your book for you and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own.
– Cheryl Strayed (via maxkirin)

(via whoinwhoville)

Verklempt & Barrel

Sometimes I write stuff. 

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

This is a thing that I wrote.

It is about mice.

It features a slightly intoxicated appearance by adulthoodisokay

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation

Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 11.21.00 PMI recently moved. You may have seen me mention it elsewhere on the internet.

My new apartment is lovely. It’s a one bedroom in a gentrifying neighborhood of Brooklyn and is within walking distance of two of my favorite coffee spots in the borough. What more could I really ask for except the couch I’m really hoping to buy tomorrow? My lovely apartment comes with a small problem though. It’s a…

View On WordPress

Talking To Strangers: Apparently A Thing I Do Now

bookoisseur:

Talking To Strangers: Apparently A Thing I Do Now

ngbbs47dc8e2ae75b7Walking home past Barclays tonight, I passed by a man and two women battling with cardboard tubes. They were roughly my age, maybe a little bit younger, and dressed casually. One girl stood to the side giggling at her friends. The other two had hefted up these cardboard tubes that were discarded beside a construction site and were swinging them at each other.

She dashed forward, raising her sword…

View On WordPress

So my friend lorrainecink is doing this Every Day May thing on her YouTube channel, and I’m going to follow her lead and get my shit together with actual writing and blogging. 

Yes that means you’ll see more of this soon.

Anonymous said: How did you get to where you are? I love to read and write and discuss books and movies and television shows and I don't know how to turn that into something I can be paid for.

I just keep writing.

I have been paid for that persistence one time and one time only.

writersrelief:

Short Story Shortcuts: 4 Techniques For Making A Big Impact In Few Words
To successfully write short fiction, you need to make a big impact in as few words as possible. So every choice you make as an author needs to be deliberate, every character needs to act with purpose, and every word needs to pack a punch. When less is definitely more, focusing on certain details can help imbue your short story with lots of color, meaning, and subtext—without superfluous words.

writersrelief:

Short Story Shortcuts: 4 Techniques For Making A Big Impact In Few Words

To successfully write short fiction, you need to make a big impact in as few words as possible. So every choice you make as an author needs to be deliberate, every character needs to act with purpose, and every word needs to pack a punch. When less is definitely more, focusing on certain details can help imbue your short story with lots of color, meaning, and subtext—without superfluous words.

rachelfershleiser:

I have worked with a public school in Harlem, PS 123, for about a decade now, and have recently started a new project with them focused on “student voice.” The goal is to bring in writers, artists, photographers and other creative professionals to show kids unique ways to find and express their voices. (via Helping Kids Find Their Voices as Writers)

Thanks for having me Dan. Such am amazing group of kids!

rachelfershleiser:

I have worked with a public school in Harlem, PS 123, for about a decade now, and have recently started a new project with them focused on “student voice.” The goal is to bring in writers, artists, photographers and other creative professionals to show kids unique ways to find and express their voices. (via Helping Kids Find Their Voices as Writers)

Thanks for having me Dan. Such am amazing group of kids!

theparisreview:

“The traveling charge, moving with the swiftness of a pen or brush, creates the eloquent impression of writing: full of drama, force, destruction, and creation.”Lilly Lampe on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Ink Art” exhibition and the beauty of meaningless writing.

theparisreview:

“The traveling charge, moving with the swiftness of a pen or brush, creates the eloquent impression of writing: full of drama, force, destruction, and creation.”

Lilly Lampe on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Ink Art” exhibition and the beauty of meaningless writing.

eatdrinkdie:

Old box fans and rotted boards balanced against the rock wall. I was visiting the neighborhood where I grew up and I slowed to a stop in front of a huge pile of trash. Years of useless garbage in front of a house where I played and ate, sometimes fought with fists, and set the small brush fires of youth. A woman lived in that house and she was the boss. She was in charge. The meals she made every day were magnificent and voluminous, especially on Sundays. Braciola. Tough cuts of beef pounded flat, rolled with slices of hardboiled egg and herbs and braised for hours. The meat drippings mingled with tomato and tasted faintly of metal. I remember the time a bread knife flew across the kitchen from the hand of one brother, aimed at the back of another. I remembered chaos and noise, a door that was always open in winter or in summer. I sat in my car and remembered how that small woman began to shrink. She hunched at the shoulders, struggling not to tip under the weight of her laundry basket. She finally started kicking it down the long hallway. I remembered years passing and the disease twisting her fingers and toes into knots. One day she couldn’t talk anymore. The woman was frozen like stone and looked like she was crying all the time. She’s laughing her children said, but it didn’t look like that to me. I remember especially the way her husband, dead now too, cared for her in those last years when she couldn’t get up from her hospital bed in a spare room off the kitchen. The sadness in his eyes at church where he prayed alone. I looked at that bed, tipped on its side and stripped down to metal links, rusting in the springtime thaw.  [Painting: Flood Plain by American painter Andrew Wyeth, 1986]

Well, I just cried at work.

eatdrinkdie:

Old box fans and rotted boards balanced against the rock wall. I was visiting the neighborhood where I grew up and I slowed to a stop in front of a huge pile of trash. Years of useless garbage in front of a house where I played and ate, sometimes fought with fists, and set the small brush fires of youth. A woman lived in that house and she was the boss. She was in charge. The meals she made every day were magnificent and voluminous, especially on Sundays. Braciola. Tough cuts of beef pounded flat, rolled with slices of hardboiled egg and herbs and braised for hours. The meat drippings mingled with tomato and tasted faintly of metal. I remember the time a bread knife flew across the kitchen from the hand of one brother, aimed at the back of another. I remembered chaos and noise, a door that was always open in winter or in summer. I sat in my car and remembered how that small woman began to shrink. She hunched at the shoulders, struggling not to tip under the weight of her laundry basket. She finally started kicking it down the long hallway. I remembered years passing and the disease twisting her fingers and toes into knots. One day she couldn’t talk anymore. The woman was frozen like stone and looked like she was crying all the time. She’s laughing her children said, but it didn’t look like that to me. I remember especially the way her husband, dead now too, cared for her in those last years when she couldn’t get up from her hospital bed in a spare room off the kitchen. The sadness in his eyes at church where he prayed alone. I looked at that bed, tipped on its side and stripped down to metal links, rusting in the springtime thaw.

[Painting: Flood Plain by American painter Andrew Wyeth, 1986]

Well, I just cried at work.

Opening the Drawer on an Old Manuscript…again
"You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner. No one is going to write your book for you and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own."
Fievel & The Mistaken Deportation
Talking To Strangers: Apparently A Thing I Do Now

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

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