/tagged/feminism/page/2

Celebgate: it's not the internet we need to fix but men's squalid behaviour

I Am Not Someone Who Is For Everyone: On Owning My Condescending Feelings Towards Douchebags

briennewalsh:

I had to realize that the male idea of successful love is to get a woman into a state of secure dependency which the male can renew by a touch or a pat or a gesture now and then while he reserves his major attention for his work in the world or the contemplation of the various forms of surrogate combat men find so transfixing. I had to realize that female-style love is servile and petitionary and moves in the direction of greater and greater displays of servility whose object is to elicit from the male partner a surplus — the word was emphasized in some way — of face-to-face attention. So on the distaff side the object is to reduce the quantity of servile display needed to keep the pacified state between the mates in being. Equilibrium or perfect mating will come when the male is convinced he is giving less than he feels is really required to maintain dependency and the woman feels she is getting more from him than her servile displays should merit.” — Norman Rush, Mating

image

Before I got married, everyone told me that life after marriage would be different. I thought that they meant that my relationship with Caleb would achieve more gravity. The vow is binding, and thus, the commitment to each other becomes an even deeper partnership.

I was wrong.

What changes in a marriage is the power dynamic between men and women. When we go away for the weekend now, as a couple, to stay with other couple friends, I spend my time in the kitchen helping the females prepare food and clean the house, and Caleb sits out on the porch or in front of the television with the other men, drinking beer and occasionally grilling.

This is the way it is.

image

"Get up," I hiss to Caleb, pinching his arm. "Get in the kitchen right now and empty the dishwasher to help us."

He does, and the other men do not follow, because unlike the women, they do not feel any guilt seeing other people do work in the kitchen — work for them — and doing nothing to help. I feel guilty. I am a woman. “I’m sorry,” I say when I see another women cooking. “Can I do anything to help?”

"Can you give me $100 to leave for food?" I ask Caleb, and he takes out his wallet. His role is to give me money, and mine is to not make a scene in front of other people.

image

Read More

You should be reading Brie’s blog. She’s smart.

Republicans Court Female Voters By Carefully Explaining That Women Are Wrong

mumblingsage:

mswyrr:

quietandsarcastic:

Oh yeah, you gotta read this. 

Yesterday, Politico published a leaked report commissioned by two Republican lobbying groups on how the party can better attract female voters. The report, based on a recent poll of 800 female registered voters as well as a series of focus groups, is titled “Republicans and Women Voters: Huge Challenges, Real Opportunities.” The central challenge facing the Republican party is that women—particularly single women and women who have graduated from college—are “barely receptive” to its policies, and are likely to consider the party “intolerant,” “lacking in compassion,” and “stuck in the past.”

Here’s where the “real opportunity” comes in: If only the Republicans could explain to these women that they are wrong, their votes would come flooding in. The report says that it is a “lack of understanding” between women and Republicans that “closes many minds to Republican policy solutions.” Republicans can attract the female vote by attacking the Democratic claim that GOP policies do not promote “fairness” for women and dealing “honestly with any disagreement on abortion” before moving on to “other issues.”

Today, R.R. Reno, editor of First Things (a journal that promotes “economic freedom” and a “morally serious culture”), published a very helpful essay illustrating how this fresh new strategy might work in practice. Reno begins his piece with a richly-drawn portrait of a hypothetical female Democratic voter: She is a “single, 35-year-old McKinsey consultant living in suburban Chicago who thinks of herself as vulnerable and votes for enhanced social programs designed to protect against the dangers and uncertainties of life.” (Reno does not specify the number of cats she owns, but for the purposes of this discussion, let’s assume the answer is “several.”) Reno speculates that this woman (whom he has invented and preprogrammed with opinions) feels “judged” by a Republican platform that opposes gay marriage, because “she intuitively senses that being pro-traditional marriage involves asserting male-female marriage as the norm—and therefore that her life isn’t on the right path.” So she votes for the Democrat, who does not appear to be “intolerant” of her lifestyle.

Here comes the part of the exercise where Reno carefully instructs this fantasy lady liberal that she has chosen poorly, and that the Republican party is the logical choice for a woman in her circumstance. This woman is suffering from “various kinds of personal unhappiness related to the lack of clear norms for how to live,” Reno writes. She secretly “wants to get married and feels vulnerable because she isn’t and vulnerable because she’s not confident she can.” And so, actually, she should support the party that wants to force people into traditional marriages, thus improving her chances of getting married herself. (Perhaps she can marry a gay man?) If only our hypothetical cat lady could get on board, she would get a husband, the Republicans would get another married woman to add to their key demographic, and gay people would get totally screwed. (Yay?)

In short, Republicans understand women plenty—it’s women who don’t understand themselves. Sounds like a promising strategy that will work with many, many sad single ladies that Republicans have invented in their brains. Next step: Finally granting imaginary women the right to vote.

A woman can’t object to legally mandating “traditional marriage” because it’s a homophobic, misogynistic airless room from hell and/or she’s queer, no, it must be that she hasn’t had the right dicking yet/found the right man. It’s not possible for a woman to have an actual, like, ideological objection to anything.

Please ignore the long history of intellectual and ideological work done by women throughout history and all the thoughtful women talking about their diverse needs and advocating for themselves today. That’s all just hysteria!

Women are only capable of being bitter, sad, Miss Havishams with a hole in their soul only marriage to a man can fill.

Right.

Suddenly I understand very clearly how Republicans can think same-sex marriage is a threat to traditional marriage. I mean, if traditional marriage is something women have to get lured into and might break away from at any instant…’cause they’re hysterical, of course…

(via laughterkey)

The End of Gamers

helms-deep:

dangolding:

The last few weeks in videogame culture have seen a level of combativeness more marked and bitter than any beforehand. 

First, a developer—a woman who makes games who has had so much piled on to her that I don’t want to perpetuate things by naming her—was the target of a harassment campaign that attacked her personal life and friendships. Campaigns of personal harassment aimed at game developers are nothing new. They are dismayingly common among those who happen to be women, or not white straight men, and doubly so if they also happen to make the sort of game that in any way challenge the status quo, even if that challenge is only made through their very existence. The viciousness and ferocity with which this campaign occurred, however, was shocking, and certainly out of the ordinary. This was something more than routine misogyny (and in games, it often is routine, shockingly). It was an ugly spectacle that should haunt and shame those involved for the rest of their lives.

It’s important to note that this hate campaign took the guise of a crusade against ‘corruption’ and ‘bias’ in the games industry, with particular emphasis on the relationships between independent game developers and the press.

These fires, already burning hot, were further fuelled yesterday by the release of the latest installment in Anita Sarkeesian’s ‘Tropes vs. Women in Video Games’ video series. In this particular video, Sarkeesian outlines “largely insignificant non-playable female characters whose sexuality or victimhood is exploited as a way to infuse edgy, gritty or racy flavoring into game worlds. These sexually objectified female bodies are designed to function as environmental texture while titillating presumed straight male players.” Today, Sarkeesian has been forced to leave her home due to some serious threats made against her and her family in response to the video. It is terrifying stuff.

Taken in their simplest, most basic form, a videogame is a creative application of computer technology. For a while, perhaps, when such technology was found mostly in masculine cultures, videogames accordingly developed a limited, inwards-looking perception of the world that marked them as different from everyone else. This is the gamer, an identity based on difference and separateness. When playing games was an unusual activity, this identity was constructed in order to define and unite the group (and to help demarcate it as a targetable demographic for business). It became deeply bound up in assumptions and performances of gender and sexuality. To be a gamer was to signal a great many things, not all of which are about the actual playing of videogames. Research like this, by Adrienne Shaw, proves this point clearly.

When, over the last decade, the playing of videogames moved beyond the niche, the gamer identity remained fairly uniformly stagnant and immobile. Gamer identity was simply not fluid enough to apply to a broad spectrum of people. It could not meaningfully contain, for example, Candy Crush players, Proteus players, and Call of Duty players simultaneously. When videogames changed, the gamer identity did not stretch, and so it has been broken.

And lest you think that I’m exaggerating about the irrelevance of the traditionally male dominated gamer identity, recent news confirms this, with adult women outnumbering teenage boys in game-playing demographics in the USA. Similar numbers also often come out of Australian surveys. The predictable ‘what kind of games do they really play, though—are they really gamers?’ response says all you need to know about this ongoing demographic shift. This insinuated criteria for ‘real’ videogames is wholly contingent on identity (i.e. a real gamer shouldn’t play Candy Crush, for instance).

On the evidence of the last few weeks, what we are seeing is the end of gamers, and the viciousness that accompanies the death of an identity. Due to fundamental shifts in the videogame audience, and a move towards progressive attitudes within more traditional areas of videogame culture, the gamer identity has been broken. It has nowhere to call home, and so it reaches out inarticulately at invented problems, such as bias and corruption, which are partly just ways of expressing confusion as to why things the traditional gamer does not understand are successful (that such confusion results in abject heartlessness is an indictment on the character of the male-focussed gamer culture to begin with).

The gamer as an identity feels like it is under assault, and so it should. Though the ‘consumer king’ gamer will continue to be targeted and exploited while their profitability as a demographic outweighs their toxicity, the traditional gamer identity is now culturally irrelevant.

The battles (and I don’t use that word lightly; in some ways perhaps ‘war’ is more appropriate) to make safe spaces for videogame cultures are long and they are resisted tempestuously, but through the pain and suffering of people who have their friendships, their personal lives, and their professions on the line, things continue to improve. The result has been a palpable progressive shift.

This shift is precisely the root of such increasingly violent hostility. The hysterical fits of those inculcated at the heart of gamer culture might on the surface be claimed as crusades for journalistic integrity, or a defense against falsehoods, but—along with a mix of the hatred of women and an expansive bigotry thrown in for good measure—what is actually going on is an attempt to retain hegemony. Make no mistake: this is the exertion of power in the name of (male) gamer orthodoxy—an orthodoxy that has already begun to disappear.

The last few weeks therefore represent the moment that gamers realised their own irrelevance. This is a cold wind that has been a long time coming, and which has framed these increasingly malicious incidents along the way. Videogames have now achieved a purchase on popular culture that is only possible without gamers.

Today, videogames are for everyone. I mean this in an almost destructive way. Videogames, to read the other side of the same statement, are not for you. You do not get to own videogames. No one gets to own videogames when they are for everyone. They add up to more than any one group.

On some level, the grim individuals who are self-centred and myopic enough to be upset at the prospect of having their medium taken away from them are absolutely right. They have astutely, and correctly identified what is going on here. Their toys are being taken away, and their treehouses are being boarded up. Videogames now live in the world and there is no going back.

I am convinced that this marks the end. We are finished here. From now on, there are no more gamers—only players.

Saw this via the emeraldcitycomicon Tumblr, but wanted to post it in its entirety because it goes along with my post earlier concerning what happened with Anna Sarkeesian.

You know who one of the most avid gamers in my family is? My mom. I grew up during the inception of home gaming systems. We got an Atari 2600 within a year of it being released. After that, it was a ColecoVision. Mom’s favorite games were Dig Dug and Squish’em Sam. We also had a Commodore 128 she played games on frequently as well.

After I moved out, she bought a Playstation, and then when the Playstation 2 came out, my siblings and I pooled together and got her one for Christmas. She’d play Spyro the Dragon, Crash Bandicoot, and Gex for hours a week. Now, she loves playing games on the iPad.

My dad could care less for games. He just never got into them. My love for gaming came from my mom. And she’s really, really good at them! Like, really good.

All that to say I never grew up with any inkling that there was such thing as the “girl gamer” myth. In fact, the first time I heard about it being a thing, I was surprised, but not surprised because society is such a misogynistically screwed up place. I’ve known girl gamers all my life. Add this to the ever growing list of things that need to die in a fire.

Also, once again, I fear for the world my kids are growing up in. It grieves me every time I read another one of these stories, and they’re becoming far too frequent, with the threats of violence becoming increasingly more and more disturbing.

I want to say more, but I’m kinda angry right now about all of it and don’t know if I’ll come across coherently.

We [Fraction and his wife, Kelly Sue DeConnick] were pregnant at the time, and while I was out there I started to realize that if I had a daughter, there would come a day when I would have to apologize to her for my profession. I would have to apologize for the way it treats and speaks to women readers, and the way it treats its female characters.

I knew that if we had a daughter, because I know my wife and I know the kind of girl she wants to raise and I know the kind of girl I want to raise, she was going to look at what I did for a living and want to know how the fuck I could stomach it. How could I sell her out like that?” Fraction continued. “That conversation is still coming, and I’m bracing for it in the way that some dads brace for their daughter’s first date or boyfriend. I became acutely aware that I had sort of done that thing that lots of privileged hetero cisgendered white dudes do. ‘I’m cool with women, and that’s enough.’ It’s not enough. It’s embarrassing to say, because we somehow have attached shame to learning and evolving our opinions, culturally, but I became aware that there was a deficiency of and to women in my work, and all I could do at that moment was take care of my side of the street.

– Writer Matt Fraction on his role in expanding the profile of female characters in the Marvel Universe. (via goodmanw)

(Source: comicbookresources.com, via comics)

We Have a Rape Gif Problem and Gawker Media Won't Do Anything About It

"Higher ups at Gawker are well aware of the problem with this feature of Kinja (our publishing platform, in case you’re new here). We receive multiple distressed emails from readers every time this happens, and have been forwarding them to the architects of Kinja and to higher ups on Gawker’s editorial side for months. Nothing has changed. During the last staff meeting, when the subject was broached, we were told that there were no plans to enable the blocking of IP addresses, no plans to record IP addresses of burner accounts. Moderation tools are supposedly in development, but change is not coming fast enough. This has been going on for months, and it’s impacting our ability to do our jobs."

Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”

Why It Matters that "Orange Is the New Black" Leaves Men Out

The title and summary of this article are misinformation click-bait meant to raise the ire of “angry” feminists on the internet. 

The actual content of the article involves the overwhelming number of men incarcerated in the US, and the public’s permission for victimhood given to women and not to men. It’s an interesting read if you can get past the title of the article.

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From ScienceImage Credit: Verizon

If boys and girls both love dinosaurs as children, why are there so many fewer women growing up and studying their evolutionary history?

The news: A new Verizon ad touches on one of the reasons behind that disparity. The commercial, released this week, reveals the subtle ways people — parents included — discourage young women from pursuing science careers.

micdotcom:

10 biggest feminist ad fails

Feminism and women’s empowerment, being the hot topic that is, has long been used by corporations to sell goods, because it (unfortunately) works. Pantene didn’t reinvent the wheel — they are merely applying what companies have already been practicing for decades. 

See the full list | Follow micdotcom

Supreme Court Just Made Getting an Abortion More Dangerous for Women

This is horrifying. I’m glad I had a huge menacing former Hell’s Angel-looking escort the one time I went to Planned Parenthood for an exam.

I hope he’s still working that beat, protecting people from the scum who hold up graphic signs and get directly in your face for trying to access healthcare.

This is a sad day.

I’ll be donating to plannedparenthood when I get paid tomorrow.

What I Will No Longer Apologize For

policymic:

9 ways American women are being lied to

These pernicious inaccuracies have been perpetuated by a society still steeped in the sexism of years past. But better data and forward-thinking research, not to mention the examples set by women in countries around the world, are proving these stereotypes wrong. And it’s high time we started paying attention. 

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

womeninmarvel:

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

A fantastic write-up by Lauren Davis at i09 that explains why female superhero outfits matter and the concept of the male gaze.

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

As Lauren puts it, 

Now is that a Superman that you’re going to take seriously? Sure, he could still crush your head without trying, but does he have the same aura of nobility—inspire the sense of same sense of awe—that he does in his usual costume?

She also discusses how a female power fantasy doesn’t have to revolve around exposing her cleavage, and how heroines dress affects young girls who should be able to look up to these characters and see themselves represented. 

It’s not that kids need to somehow be shielded from images of women’s breasts and abs. Rather, it’s that these costumes convey a message to children about what powerful women look like. If a girl wants to grow up to be as strong as Wonder Woman, as powerful as Psylocke, as skilled as Elektra, does she have to put her body on display for the pleasure of other people, too? 

For more, check out the link!

Celebgate: it's not the internet we need to fix but men's squalid behaviour

I Am Not Someone Who Is For Everyone: On Owning My Condescending Feelings Towards Douchebags

briennewalsh:

I had to realize that the male idea of successful love is to get a woman into a state of secure dependency which the male can renew by a touch or a pat or a gesture now and then while he reserves his major attention for his work in the world or the contemplation of the various forms of surrogate combat men find so transfixing. I had to realize that female-style love is servile and petitionary and moves in the direction of greater and greater displays of servility whose object is to elicit from the male partner a surplus — the word was emphasized in some way — of face-to-face attention. So on the distaff side the object is to reduce the quantity of servile display needed to keep the pacified state between the mates in being. Equilibrium or perfect mating will come when the male is convinced he is giving less than he feels is really required to maintain dependency and the woman feels she is getting more from him than her servile displays should merit.” — Norman Rush, Mating

image

Before I got married, everyone told me that life after marriage would be different. I thought that they meant that my relationship with Caleb would achieve more gravity. The vow is binding, and thus, the commitment to each other becomes an even deeper partnership.

I was wrong.

What changes in a marriage is the power dynamic between men and women. When we go away for the weekend now, as a couple, to stay with other couple friends, I spend my time in the kitchen helping the females prepare food and clean the house, and Caleb sits out on the porch or in front of the television with the other men, drinking beer and occasionally grilling.

This is the way it is.

image

"Get up," I hiss to Caleb, pinching his arm. "Get in the kitchen right now and empty the dishwasher to help us."

He does, and the other men do not follow, because unlike the women, they do not feel any guilt seeing other people do work in the kitchen — work for them — and doing nothing to help. I feel guilty. I am a woman. “I’m sorry,” I say when I see another women cooking. “Can I do anything to help?”

"Can you give me $100 to leave for food?" I ask Caleb, and he takes out his wallet. His role is to give me money, and mine is to not make a scene in front of other people.

image

Read More

You should be reading Brie’s blog. She’s smart.

Republicans Court Female Voters By Carefully Explaining That Women Are Wrong

mumblingsage:

mswyrr:

quietandsarcastic:

Oh yeah, you gotta read this. 

Yesterday, Politico published a leaked report commissioned by two Republican lobbying groups on how the party can better attract female voters. The report, based on a recent poll of 800 female registered voters as well as a series of focus groups, is titled “Republicans and Women Voters: Huge Challenges, Real Opportunities.” The central challenge facing the Republican party is that women—particularly single women and women who have graduated from college—are “barely receptive” to its policies, and are likely to consider the party “intolerant,” “lacking in compassion,” and “stuck in the past.”

Here’s where the “real opportunity” comes in: If only the Republicans could explain to these women that they are wrong, their votes would come flooding in. The report says that it is a “lack of understanding” between women and Republicans that “closes many minds to Republican policy solutions.” Republicans can attract the female vote by attacking the Democratic claim that GOP policies do not promote “fairness” for women and dealing “honestly with any disagreement on abortion” before moving on to “other issues.”

Today, R.R. Reno, editor of First Things (a journal that promotes “economic freedom” and a “morally serious culture”), published a very helpful essay illustrating how this fresh new strategy might work in practice. Reno begins his piece with a richly-drawn portrait of a hypothetical female Democratic voter: She is a “single, 35-year-old McKinsey consultant living in suburban Chicago who thinks of herself as vulnerable and votes for enhanced social programs designed to protect against the dangers and uncertainties of life.” (Reno does not specify the number of cats she owns, but for the purposes of this discussion, let’s assume the answer is “several.”) Reno speculates that this woman (whom he has invented and preprogrammed with opinions) feels “judged” by a Republican platform that opposes gay marriage, because “she intuitively senses that being pro-traditional marriage involves asserting male-female marriage as the norm—and therefore that her life isn’t on the right path.” So she votes for the Democrat, who does not appear to be “intolerant” of her lifestyle.

Here comes the part of the exercise where Reno carefully instructs this fantasy lady liberal that she has chosen poorly, and that the Republican party is the logical choice for a woman in her circumstance. This woman is suffering from “various kinds of personal unhappiness related to the lack of clear norms for how to live,” Reno writes. She secretly “wants to get married and feels vulnerable because she isn’t and vulnerable because she’s not confident she can.” And so, actually, she should support the party that wants to force people into traditional marriages, thus improving her chances of getting married herself. (Perhaps she can marry a gay man?) If only our hypothetical cat lady could get on board, she would get a husband, the Republicans would get another married woman to add to their key demographic, and gay people would get totally screwed. (Yay?)

In short, Republicans understand women plenty—it’s women who don’t understand themselves. Sounds like a promising strategy that will work with many, many sad single ladies that Republicans have invented in their brains. Next step: Finally granting imaginary women the right to vote.

A woman can’t object to legally mandating “traditional marriage” because it’s a homophobic, misogynistic airless room from hell and/or she’s queer, no, it must be that she hasn’t had the right dicking yet/found the right man. It’s not possible for a woman to have an actual, like, ideological objection to anything.

Please ignore the long history of intellectual and ideological work done by women throughout history and all the thoughtful women talking about their diverse needs and advocating for themselves today. That’s all just hysteria!

Women are only capable of being bitter, sad, Miss Havishams with a hole in their soul only marriage to a man can fill.

Right.

Suddenly I understand very clearly how Republicans can think same-sex marriage is a threat to traditional marriage. I mean, if traditional marriage is something women have to get lured into and might break away from at any instant…’cause they’re hysterical, of course…

(via laughterkey)

The End of Gamers

helms-deep:

dangolding:

The last few weeks in videogame culture have seen a level of combativeness more marked and bitter than any beforehand. 

First, a developer—a woman who makes games who has had so much piled on to her that I don’t want to perpetuate things by naming her—was the target of a harassment campaign that attacked her personal life and friendships. Campaigns of personal harassment aimed at game developers are nothing new. They are dismayingly common among those who happen to be women, or not white straight men, and doubly so if they also happen to make the sort of game that in any way challenge the status quo, even if that challenge is only made through their very existence. The viciousness and ferocity with which this campaign occurred, however, was shocking, and certainly out of the ordinary. This was something more than routine misogyny (and in games, it often is routine, shockingly). It was an ugly spectacle that should haunt and shame those involved for the rest of their lives.

It’s important to note that this hate campaign took the guise of a crusade against ‘corruption’ and ‘bias’ in the games industry, with particular emphasis on the relationships between independent game developers and the press.

These fires, already burning hot, were further fuelled yesterday by the release of the latest installment in Anita Sarkeesian’s ‘Tropes vs. Women in Video Games’ video series. In this particular video, Sarkeesian outlines “largely insignificant non-playable female characters whose sexuality or victimhood is exploited as a way to infuse edgy, gritty or racy flavoring into game worlds. These sexually objectified female bodies are designed to function as environmental texture while titillating presumed straight male players.” Today, Sarkeesian has been forced to leave her home due to some serious threats made against her and her family in response to the video. It is terrifying stuff.

Taken in their simplest, most basic form, a videogame is a creative application of computer technology. For a while, perhaps, when such technology was found mostly in masculine cultures, videogames accordingly developed a limited, inwards-looking perception of the world that marked them as different from everyone else. This is the gamer, an identity based on difference and separateness. When playing games was an unusual activity, this identity was constructed in order to define and unite the group (and to help demarcate it as a targetable demographic for business). It became deeply bound up in assumptions and performances of gender and sexuality. To be a gamer was to signal a great many things, not all of which are about the actual playing of videogames. Research like this, by Adrienne Shaw, proves this point clearly.

When, over the last decade, the playing of videogames moved beyond the niche, the gamer identity remained fairly uniformly stagnant and immobile. Gamer identity was simply not fluid enough to apply to a broad spectrum of people. It could not meaningfully contain, for example, Candy Crush players, Proteus players, and Call of Duty players simultaneously. When videogames changed, the gamer identity did not stretch, and so it has been broken.

And lest you think that I’m exaggerating about the irrelevance of the traditionally male dominated gamer identity, recent news confirms this, with adult women outnumbering teenage boys in game-playing demographics in the USA. Similar numbers also often come out of Australian surveys. The predictable ‘what kind of games do they really play, though—are they really gamers?’ response says all you need to know about this ongoing demographic shift. This insinuated criteria for ‘real’ videogames is wholly contingent on identity (i.e. a real gamer shouldn’t play Candy Crush, for instance).

On the evidence of the last few weeks, what we are seeing is the end of gamers, and the viciousness that accompanies the death of an identity. Due to fundamental shifts in the videogame audience, and a move towards progressive attitudes within more traditional areas of videogame culture, the gamer identity has been broken. It has nowhere to call home, and so it reaches out inarticulately at invented problems, such as bias and corruption, which are partly just ways of expressing confusion as to why things the traditional gamer does not understand are successful (that such confusion results in abject heartlessness is an indictment on the character of the male-focussed gamer culture to begin with).

The gamer as an identity feels like it is under assault, and so it should. Though the ‘consumer king’ gamer will continue to be targeted and exploited while their profitability as a demographic outweighs their toxicity, the traditional gamer identity is now culturally irrelevant.

The battles (and I don’t use that word lightly; in some ways perhaps ‘war’ is more appropriate) to make safe spaces for videogame cultures are long and they are resisted tempestuously, but through the pain and suffering of people who have their friendships, their personal lives, and their professions on the line, things continue to improve. The result has been a palpable progressive shift.

This shift is precisely the root of such increasingly violent hostility. The hysterical fits of those inculcated at the heart of gamer culture might on the surface be claimed as crusades for journalistic integrity, or a defense against falsehoods, but—along with a mix of the hatred of women and an expansive bigotry thrown in for good measure—what is actually going on is an attempt to retain hegemony. Make no mistake: this is the exertion of power in the name of (male) gamer orthodoxy—an orthodoxy that has already begun to disappear.

The last few weeks therefore represent the moment that gamers realised their own irrelevance. This is a cold wind that has been a long time coming, and which has framed these increasingly malicious incidents along the way. Videogames have now achieved a purchase on popular culture that is only possible without gamers.

Today, videogames are for everyone. I mean this in an almost destructive way. Videogames, to read the other side of the same statement, are not for you. You do not get to own videogames. No one gets to own videogames when they are for everyone. They add up to more than any one group.

On some level, the grim individuals who are self-centred and myopic enough to be upset at the prospect of having their medium taken away from them are absolutely right. They have astutely, and correctly identified what is going on here. Their toys are being taken away, and their treehouses are being boarded up. Videogames now live in the world and there is no going back.

I am convinced that this marks the end. We are finished here. From now on, there are no more gamers—only players.

Saw this via the emeraldcitycomicon Tumblr, but wanted to post it in its entirety because it goes along with my post earlier concerning what happened with Anna Sarkeesian.

You know who one of the most avid gamers in my family is? My mom. I grew up during the inception of home gaming systems. We got an Atari 2600 within a year of it being released. After that, it was a ColecoVision. Mom’s favorite games were Dig Dug and Squish’em Sam. We also had a Commodore 128 she played games on frequently as well.

After I moved out, she bought a Playstation, and then when the Playstation 2 came out, my siblings and I pooled together and got her one for Christmas. She’d play Spyro the Dragon, Crash Bandicoot, and Gex for hours a week. Now, she loves playing games on the iPad.

My dad could care less for games. He just never got into them. My love for gaming came from my mom. And she’s really, really good at them! Like, really good.

All that to say I never grew up with any inkling that there was such thing as the “girl gamer” myth. In fact, the first time I heard about it being a thing, I was surprised, but not surprised because society is such a misogynistically screwed up place. I’ve known girl gamers all my life. Add this to the ever growing list of things that need to die in a fire.

Also, once again, I fear for the world my kids are growing up in. It grieves me every time I read another one of these stories, and they’re becoming far too frequent, with the threats of violence becoming increasingly more and more disturbing.

I want to say more, but I’m kinda angry right now about all of it and don’t know if I’ll come across coherently.

We [Fraction and his wife, Kelly Sue DeConnick] were pregnant at the time, and while I was out there I started to realize that if I had a daughter, there would come a day when I would have to apologize to her for my profession. I would have to apologize for the way it treats and speaks to women readers, and the way it treats its female characters.

I knew that if we had a daughter, because I know my wife and I know the kind of girl she wants to raise and I know the kind of girl I want to raise, she was going to look at what I did for a living and want to know how the fuck I could stomach it. How could I sell her out like that?” Fraction continued. “That conversation is still coming, and I’m bracing for it in the way that some dads brace for their daughter’s first date or boyfriend. I became acutely aware that I had sort of done that thing that lots of privileged hetero cisgendered white dudes do. ‘I’m cool with women, and that’s enough.’ It’s not enough. It’s embarrassing to say, because we somehow have attached shame to learning and evolving our opinions, culturally, but I became aware that there was a deficiency of and to women in my work, and all I could do at that moment was take care of my side of the street.

– Writer Matt Fraction on his role in expanding the profile of female characters in the Marvel Universe. (via goodmanw)

(Source: comicbookresources.com, via comics)

We Have a Rape Gif Problem and Gawker Media Won't Do Anything About It

"Higher ups at Gawker are well aware of the problem with this feature of Kinja (our publishing platform, in case you’re new here). We receive multiple distressed emails from readers every time this happens, and have been forwarding them to the architects of Kinja and to higher ups on Gawker’s editorial side for months. Nothing has changed. During the last staff meeting, when the subject was broached, we were told that there were no plans to enable the blocking of IP addresses, no plans to record IP addresses of burner accounts. Moderation tools are supposedly in development, but change is not coming fast enough. This has been going on for months, and it’s impacting our ability to do our jobs."

Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”

Why It Matters that "Orange Is the New Black" Leaves Men Out

The title and summary of this article are misinformation click-bait meant to raise the ire of “angry” feminists on the internet. 

The actual content of the article involves the overwhelming number of men incarcerated in the US, and the public’s permission for victimhood given to women and not to men. It’s an interesting read if you can get past the title of the article.

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From ScienceImage Credit: Verizon

If boys and girls both love dinosaurs as children, why are there so many fewer women growing up and studying their evolutionary history?

The news: A new Verizon ad touches on one of the reasons behind that disparity. The commercial, released this week, reveals the subtle ways people — parents included — discourage young women from pursuing science careers.

micdotcom:

10 biggest feminist ad fails

Feminism and women’s empowerment, being the hot topic that is, has long been used by corporations to sell goods, because it (unfortunately) works. Pantene didn’t reinvent the wheel — they are merely applying what companies have already been practicing for decades. 

See the full list | Follow micdotcom

Supreme Court Just Made Getting an Abortion More Dangerous for Women

This is horrifying. I’m glad I had a huge menacing former Hell’s Angel-looking escort the one time I went to Planned Parenthood for an exam.

I hope he’s still working that beat, protecting people from the scum who hold up graphic signs and get directly in your face for trying to access healthcare.

This is a sad day.

I’ll be donating to plannedparenthood when I get paid tomorrow.

What I Will No Longer Apologize For

policymic:

9 ways American women are being lied to

These pernicious inaccuracies have been perpetuated by a society still steeped in the sexism of years past. But better data and forward-thinking research, not to mention the examples set by women in countries around the world, are proving these stereotypes wrong. And it’s high time we started paying attention. 

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

womeninmarvel:

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

A fantastic write-up by Lauren Davis at i09 that explains why female superhero outfits matter and the concept of the male gaze.

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

As Lauren puts it, 

Now is that a Superman that you’re going to take seriously? Sure, he could still crush your head without trying, but does he have the same aura of nobility—inspire the sense of same sense of awe—that he does in his usual costume?

She also discusses how a female power fantasy doesn’t have to revolve around exposing her cleavage, and how heroines dress affects young girls who should be able to look up to these characters and see themselves represented. 

It’s not that kids need to somehow be shielded from images of women’s breasts and abs. Rather, it’s that these costumes convey a message to children about what powerful women look like. If a girl wants to grow up to be as strong as Wonder Woman, as powerful as Psylocke, as skilled as Elektra, does she have to put her body on display for the pleasure of other people, too? 

For more, check out the link!

I Am Not Someone Who Is For Everyone: On Owning My Condescending Feelings Towards Douchebags
The End of Gamers
"

We [Fraction and his wife, Kelly Sue DeConnick] were pregnant at the time, and while I was out there I started to realize that if I had a daughter, there would come a day when I would have to apologize to her for my profession. I would have to apologize for the way it treats and speaks to women readers, and the way it treats its female characters.

I knew that if we had a daughter, because I know my wife and I know the kind of girl she wants to raise and I know the kind of girl I want to raise, she was going to look at what I did for a living and want to know how the fuck I could stomach it. How could I sell her out like that?” Fraction continued. “That conversation is still coming, and I’m bracing for it in the way that some dads brace for their daughter’s first date or boyfriend. I became acutely aware that I had sort of done that thing that lots of privileged hetero cisgendered white dudes do. ‘I’m cool with women, and that’s enough.’ It’s not enough. It’s embarrassing to say, because we somehow have attached shame to learning and evolving our opinions, culturally, but I became aware that there was a deficiency of and to women in my work, and all I could do at that moment was take care of my side of the street.

"
"Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”"
One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and am currently writing for Nerdist. I tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

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