/tagged/feminism/page/2
Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”

Why It Matters that "Orange Is the New Black" Leaves Men Out

The title and summary of this article are misinformation click-bait meant to raise the ire of “angry” feminists on the internet. 

The actual content of the article involves the overwhelming number of men incarcerated in the US, and the public’s permission for victimhood given to women and not to men. It’s an interesting read if you can get past the title of the article.

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From ScienceImage Credit: Verizon

If boys and girls both love dinosaurs as children, why are there so many fewer women growing up and studying their evolutionary history?

The news: A new Verizon ad touches on one of the reasons behind that disparity. The commercial, released this week, reveals the subtle ways people — parents included — discourage young women from pursuing science careers.

micdotcom:

10 biggest feminist ad fails

Feminism and women’s empowerment, being the hot topic that is, has long been used by corporations to sell goods, because it (unfortunately) works. Pantene didn’t reinvent the wheel — they are merely applying what companies have already been practicing for decades. 

See the full list | Follow micdotcom

Supreme Court Just Made Getting an Abortion More Dangerous for Women

This is horrifying. I’m glad I had a huge menacing former Hell’s Angel-looking escort the one time I went to Planned Parenthood for an exam.

I hope he’s still working that beat, protecting people from the scum who hold up graphic signs and get directly in your face for trying to access healthcare.

This is a sad day.

I’ll be donating to plannedparenthood when I get paid tomorrow.

What I Will No Longer Apologize For

policymic:

9 ways American women are being lied to

These pernicious inaccuracies have been perpetuated by a society still steeped in the sexism of years past. But better data and forward-thinking research, not to mention the examples set by women in countries around the world, are proving these stereotypes wrong. And it’s high time we started paying attention. 

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

womeninmarvel:

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

A fantastic write-up by Lauren Davis at i09 that explains why female superhero outfits matter and the concept of the male gaze.

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

As Lauren puts it, 

Now is that a Superman that you’re going to take seriously? Sure, he could still crush your head without trying, but does he have the same aura of nobility—inspire the sense of same sense of awe—that he does in his usual costume?

She also discusses how a female power fantasy doesn’t have to revolve around exposing her cleavage, and how heroines dress affects young girls who should be able to look up to these characters and see themselves represented. 

It’s not that kids need to somehow be shielded from images of women’s breasts and abs. Rather, it’s that these costumes convey a message to children about what powerful women look like. If a girl wants to grow up to be as strong as Wonder Woman, as powerful as Psylocke, as skilled as Elektra, does she have to put her body on display for the pleasure of other people, too? 

For more, check out the link!

Yet, in just the past year, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled that a woman can be fired if her boss finds her attractive, a New York court decided that unpaid interns can’t sue for sexual harassment, and the Paycheck Fairness Act was defeated by Republicans who claimed women actually prefer lower-paying jobs.

grimandhopeless:

These are all extremely fair points

(Source: lospaziobianco, via betthearm)

Sorry To Burst Your Masturbatory Comic Bubble (No, I’m Not)

thebirdandthebat:

I have a theory on why a small segment of men who read comics send rape threats to women who write about comics. To put it simply, they think we’re destroying their masturbatory fantasies (literal or otherwise).

You may laugh but it’s quite possibly the source of all the hatemongering. They’re under the impression comics are for men. Men only. And the characters therein, specifically the female characters, are there for them to ogle. The mere thought of that being taken away from them is frightening (even though, you know, porn and porn comics!). So frightening they will do anything to stop it. And they think silencing women with threats is the answer.

Can’t blame them for that thinking completely. After all, comics have been marketed at men 18-34 for a long time. But, and this is always what gets me, if you want your precious comic books to exist in 20 years, you need other demographics to read them.

The first time I was called a “cunt” online (Oh, boy! I must have missed the day in my college journalism courses where they went over that part of the job!), was when I wrote an op/ed titled, “Aquaman Needs a New Costume" for Newsarama back in 2010 (at least this is the first time I remember). I had written for Comic Book Resources previously but before then, had only written convention coverage or interviews. Here I was, writing my previously Heartless Doll-hosted comic book column "Hey, That’s My Cape!, a woman, giving an opinion on a comic book character’s costume (a male character at that), and I was harassed for it.

It was incomprehensible to me at the time, having only really been on the receiving end of the warm and fuzzy part of the comics community before then, that someone would have such vitriol over a comic book. Of course, it wouldn’t be the last time I gave my opinion online and therefore, was just the first in a long line of misogynist hate directed toward me (I have a “shithead” folder in my email as well as one on my desktop filled with screenshots of the offenders).

We could call them assholes. They are. But so is the driver who decides they need to get in front of me in rush hour traffic. These people are worse and they shouldn’t be excused with a wave of the hand.

When these issues are brought up, there are always responses to the effect of, “I haven’t seen it so it doesn’t exist.” My guess is, they have seen it. They either ignore it, or it’s such a part of the way they were brought up it doesn’t even register. But for a larger portion of people seeing others bring up issues of misogyny in the comics community, it’s a no-brainer. “This is bad.” “This needs to stop.” 

Janelle Asselin, a good friend and colleague of mine, spurred this recent round of discussion thanks to a critique she wrote on CBR of a new Teen Titans comic book cover. Because one of her critiques happened to include the size and shape of a teenage character’s breasts, she received all manner of harassment, including rape threats sent via a survey she was conducting on…wait for it…sexual harassment in the comic community.

What Janelle experienced (some more details in her own words here), was not new. Let me repeat. Was. Not. New. It’s happened for years, to countless individuals. Not just in comics, obviously, but every industry. 

I’m happy to see folks like Dan Slott, Brian Michael Bendis, Matt Fraction, and more - probably big names to the disgusting offenders - publicly decrying the behavior as abhorrent and unacceptable. Fellow journalist (and dude) Andy Khouri just added to the growing pile with a piece on Comics Alliance, “Fake Geek Guys: A Message About Sexual Harassment.”

But a part of me is also sad. Why? One, because this has been going on for far too long (This is just the latest outcry. Remember when Mark Millar got involved after hearing about a notoriously vile troll who went after myself, dcwomenkickingass and others? That’s just one of many.) and because these men’s voices seem to carry louder in the community than the women who’ve been experiencing it first hand and speaking out about it for years. And two, because I’m not sure it will have any effect whatsoever on the offenders. That minuscule segment of the community is set in its ways. Comics are for them. Don’t let anyone else in. This set of Double D’s are for me. Period.

It’s also important to remember there are numerous women without someone famous speaking on their behalf. I know women who have quit doing what they love because of the threats they’ve received and how scared they’d been made to live as a result. It’s unacceptable. So what do we do? 

Rachel Edidin had some good thoughts in her recent Tumblr post but bottom line? Shun them. Seriously. Shun them. Do not accept them in our community. You may say, “I’ve never seen someone make a rape threat online,” but can you say the same about a rape joke, or a man telling a women she’s being “too emotional” or “she needs to get laid?” My guess is no. And guess what? That’s where it starts. Making someones’ gender an attack point.

You see it. You know you do. Next time, say something.

Comics, I kind of hate you right now

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my enjoyment of comics. What’s killing it for me is the harassment former DC editor, current Comics Alliance writer, and all-around awesome lady Janelle Asselin is trying to dig into and, in the process, has become a target of.

For the time I was writing somewhat regularly about comics, I was discouraged from writing about “uncomfortable” topics like sexism or feminism. This wasn’t for all the sites I wrote for. But I did get the feeling I was allowed to hang out in the special tree house with the boys as long as I acted like one of the boys and didn’t turn into one of those uppity feminists. And I get wanting to keep the focus on comics and the great things about them. Trust me, I would love to go back to the days of unabashedly adoring comics.

But that’s not enough anymore.

It’s easy to say women should be able to do everything a man can do: they can be astronauts and writers and scientists and the President of the United States if they work for it, they should be paid the same wages as their male counterparts, they should have the right to vote and drive a car and do everyday people things without hinderance, etc.

But that’s not where gender equality ends. People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of “gender” without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff.

So when someone gets catcalled or threatened or browbeaten, you have to stand up and say NO. And look, I get that’s uncomfortable and confrontational and hard, honestly hard, to do. I’m guilty of not saying anything, of plowing along with my head in the sand and just gushing over my funny pages. But like I said, that’s not enough anymore. We need to have this conversation; we need to call this bullshit behavior out.

Because ignoring the harassment is condoning it. It undermines the severity of the situation. It tells the victims that we care more about their attackers than we do about them. Not to mention, the instances when people flat out tell victims of harassment that they’re exaggerating the facts, or “that’s not what he meant” or “get over it and stop being so emotional.”

And that is fucked up. Seriously fucked up. We need to do better, people. We need to do a lot better.

And for the morning crowd.

Comics, I kind of hate you right now

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my enjoyment of comics. What’s killing it for me is the harassment former DC editor, current Comics Alliance writer, and all-around awesome lady Janelle Asselin is trying to dig into and, in the process, become a target of.

For the time I was writing somewhat regularly about comics, I was discouraged from writing about “uncomfortable” topics like sexism or feminism. This wasn’t for all the sites I wrote for. But I did get the feeling I was allowed to hang out in the special tree house with the boys as long as I acted like one of the boys and didn’t turn into one of those uppity feminists. And I get wanting to keep the focus on comics and the great things about them. Trust me, I would love to go back to the days of unabashedly adoring comics.

But that’s not enough anymore.

It’s easy to say women should be able to do everything a man can do: they can be astronauts and writers and scientists and the President of the United States if they work for it, they should be paid the same wages as their male counterparts, they should have the right to vote and drive a car and do everyday people things without hinderance, etc.

But that’s not where gender equality ends. People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of “gender” without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff.

So when someone gets catcalled or threatened or browbeaten, you have to stand up and say NO. And look, I get that’s uncomfortable and confrontational and hard, honestly hard, to do. I’m guilty of not saying anything, of plowing along with my head in the sand and just gushing over my funny pages. But like I said, that’s not enough anymore. We need to have this conversation; we need to call this bullshit behavior out.

Because ignoring the harassment is condoning it. It undermines the severity of the situation. It tells the victims that we care more about their attackers than we do about them. Not to mention, the instances when people flat out tell victims of harassment that they’re exaggerating the facts, or “that’s not what he meant” or “get over it and stop being so emotional.”

And that is fucked up. Seriously fucked up. We need to do better, people. We need to do a lot better.

Let’s be better.

Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”

Why It Matters that "Orange Is the New Black" Leaves Men Out

The title and summary of this article are misinformation click-bait meant to raise the ire of “angry” feminists on the internet. 

The actual content of the article involves the overwhelming number of men incarcerated in the US, and the public’s permission for victimhood given to women and not to men. It’s an interesting read if you can get past the title of the article.

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science

One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From ScienceImage Credit: Verizon

If boys and girls both love dinosaurs as children, why are there so many fewer women growing up and studying their evolutionary history?

The news: A new Verizon ad touches on one of the reasons behind that disparity. The commercial, released this week, reveals the subtle ways people — parents included — discourage young women from pursuing science careers.

micdotcom:

10 biggest feminist ad fails

Feminism and women’s empowerment, being the hot topic that is, has long been used by corporations to sell goods, because it (unfortunately) works. Pantene didn’t reinvent the wheel — they are merely applying what companies have already been practicing for decades. 

See the full list | Follow micdotcom

Supreme Court Just Made Getting an Abortion More Dangerous for Women

This is horrifying. I’m glad I had a huge menacing former Hell’s Angel-looking escort the one time I went to Planned Parenthood for an exam.

I hope he’s still working that beat, protecting people from the scum who hold up graphic signs and get directly in your face for trying to access healthcare.

This is a sad day.

I’ll be donating to plannedparenthood when I get paid tomorrow.

What I Will No Longer Apologize For

policymic:

9 ways American women are being lied to

These pernicious inaccuracies have been perpetuated by a society still steeped in the sexism of years past. But better data and forward-thinking research, not to mention the examples set by women in countries around the world, are proving these stereotypes wrong. And it’s high time we started paying attention. 

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

womeninmarvel:

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

A fantastic write-up by Lauren Davis at i09 that explains why female superhero outfits matter and the concept of the male gaze.

Why Do We Care So Much About What Female Superheroes Wear, Anyway?

As Lauren puts it, 

Now is that a Superman that you’re going to take seriously? Sure, he could still crush your head without trying, but does he have the same aura of nobility—inspire the sense of same sense of awe—that he does in his usual costume?

She also discusses how a female power fantasy doesn’t have to revolve around exposing her cleavage, and how heroines dress affects young girls who should be able to look up to these characters and see themselves represented. 

It’s not that kids need to somehow be shielded from images of women’s breasts and abs. Rather, it’s that these costumes convey a message to children about what powerful women look like. If a girl wants to grow up to be as strong as Wonder Woman, as powerful as Psylocke, as skilled as Elektra, does she have to put her body on display for the pleasure of other people, too? 

For more, check out the link!

Yet, in just the past year, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled that a woman can be fired if her boss finds her attractive, a New York court decided that unpaid interns can’t sue for sexual harassment, and the Paycheck Fairness Act was defeated by Republicans who claimed women actually prefer lower-paying jobs.

grimandhopeless:

These are all extremely fair points

(Source: lospaziobianco, via betthearm)

Sorry To Burst Your Masturbatory Comic Bubble (No, I’m Not)

thebirdandthebat:

I have a theory on why a small segment of men who read comics send rape threats to women who write about comics. To put it simply, they think we’re destroying their masturbatory fantasies (literal or otherwise).

You may laugh but it’s quite possibly the source of all the hatemongering. They’re under the impression comics are for men. Men only. And the characters therein, specifically the female characters, are there for them to ogle. The mere thought of that being taken away from them is frightening (even though, you know, porn and porn comics!). So frightening they will do anything to stop it. And they think silencing women with threats is the answer.

Can’t blame them for that thinking completely. After all, comics have been marketed at men 18-34 for a long time. But, and this is always what gets me, if you want your precious comic books to exist in 20 years, you need other demographics to read them.

The first time I was called a “cunt” online (Oh, boy! I must have missed the day in my college journalism courses where they went over that part of the job!), was when I wrote an op/ed titled, “Aquaman Needs a New Costume" for Newsarama back in 2010 (at least this is the first time I remember). I had written for Comic Book Resources previously but before then, had only written convention coverage or interviews. Here I was, writing my previously Heartless Doll-hosted comic book column "Hey, That’s My Cape!, a woman, giving an opinion on a comic book character’s costume (a male character at that), and I was harassed for it.

It was incomprehensible to me at the time, having only really been on the receiving end of the warm and fuzzy part of the comics community before then, that someone would have such vitriol over a comic book. Of course, it wouldn’t be the last time I gave my opinion online and therefore, was just the first in a long line of misogynist hate directed toward me (I have a “shithead” folder in my email as well as one on my desktop filled with screenshots of the offenders).

We could call them assholes. They are. But so is the driver who decides they need to get in front of me in rush hour traffic. These people are worse and they shouldn’t be excused with a wave of the hand.

When these issues are brought up, there are always responses to the effect of, “I haven’t seen it so it doesn’t exist.” My guess is, they have seen it. They either ignore it, or it’s such a part of the way they were brought up it doesn’t even register. But for a larger portion of people seeing others bring up issues of misogyny in the comics community, it’s a no-brainer. “This is bad.” “This needs to stop.” 

Janelle Asselin, a good friend and colleague of mine, spurred this recent round of discussion thanks to a critique she wrote on CBR of a new Teen Titans comic book cover. Because one of her critiques happened to include the size and shape of a teenage character’s breasts, she received all manner of harassment, including rape threats sent via a survey she was conducting on…wait for it…sexual harassment in the comic community.

What Janelle experienced (some more details in her own words here), was not new. Let me repeat. Was. Not. New. It’s happened for years, to countless individuals. Not just in comics, obviously, but every industry. 

I’m happy to see folks like Dan Slott, Brian Michael Bendis, Matt Fraction, and more - probably big names to the disgusting offenders - publicly decrying the behavior as abhorrent and unacceptable. Fellow journalist (and dude) Andy Khouri just added to the growing pile with a piece on Comics Alliance, “Fake Geek Guys: A Message About Sexual Harassment.”

But a part of me is also sad. Why? One, because this has been going on for far too long (This is just the latest outcry. Remember when Mark Millar got involved after hearing about a notoriously vile troll who went after myself, dcwomenkickingass and others? That’s just one of many.) and because these men’s voices seem to carry louder in the community than the women who’ve been experiencing it first hand and speaking out about it for years. And two, because I’m not sure it will have any effect whatsoever on the offenders. That minuscule segment of the community is set in its ways. Comics are for them. Don’t let anyone else in. This set of Double D’s are for me. Period.

It’s also important to remember there are numerous women without someone famous speaking on their behalf. I know women who have quit doing what they love because of the threats they’ve received and how scared they’d been made to live as a result. It’s unacceptable. So what do we do? 

Rachel Edidin had some good thoughts in her recent Tumblr post but bottom line? Shun them. Seriously. Shun them. Do not accept them in our community. You may say, “I’ve never seen someone make a rape threat online,” but can you say the same about a rape joke, or a man telling a women she’s being “too emotional” or “she needs to get laid?” My guess is no. And guess what? That’s where it starts. Making someones’ gender an attack point.

You see it. You know you do. Next time, say something.

Comics, I kind of hate you right now

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my enjoyment of comics. What’s killing it for me is the harassment former DC editor, current Comics Alliance writer, and all-around awesome lady Janelle Asselin is trying to dig into and, in the process, has become a target of.

For the time I was writing somewhat regularly about comics, I was discouraged from writing about “uncomfortable” topics like sexism or feminism. This wasn’t for all the sites I wrote for. But I did get the feeling I was allowed to hang out in the special tree house with the boys as long as I acted like one of the boys and didn’t turn into one of those uppity feminists. And I get wanting to keep the focus on comics and the great things about them. Trust me, I would love to go back to the days of unabashedly adoring comics.

But that’s not enough anymore.

It’s easy to say women should be able to do everything a man can do: they can be astronauts and writers and scientists and the President of the United States if they work for it, they should be paid the same wages as their male counterparts, they should have the right to vote and drive a car and do everyday people things without hinderance, etc.

But that’s not where gender equality ends. People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of “gender” without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff.

So when someone gets catcalled or threatened or browbeaten, you have to stand up and say NO. And look, I get that’s uncomfortable and confrontational and hard, honestly hard, to do. I’m guilty of not saying anything, of plowing along with my head in the sand and just gushing over my funny pages. But like I said, that’s not enough anymore. We need to have this conversation; we need to call this bullshit behavior out.

Because ignoring the harassment is condoning it. It undermines the severity of the situation. It tells the victims that we care more about their attackers than we do about them. Not to mention, the instances when people flat out tell victims of harassment that they’re exaggerating the facts, or “that’s not what he meant” or “get over it and stop being so emotional.”

And that is fucked up. Seriously fucked up. We need to do better, people. We need to do a lot better.

And for the morning crowd.

Comics, I kind of hate you right now

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my enjoyment of comics. What’s killing it for me is the harassment former DC editor, current Comics Alliance writer, and all-around awesome lady Janelle Asselin is trying to dig into and, in the process, become a target of.

For the time I was writing somewhat regularly about comics, I was discouraged from writing about “uncomfortable” topics like sexism or feminism. This wasn’t for all the sites I wrote for. But I did get the feeling I was allowed to hang out in the special tree house with the boys as long as I acted like one of the boys and didn’t turn into one of those uppity feminists. And I get wanting to keep the focus on comics and the great things about them. Trust me, I would love to go back to the days of unabashedly adoring comics.

But that’s not enough anymore.

It’s easy to say women should be able to do everything a man can do: they can be astronauts and writers and scientists and the President of the United States if they work for it, they should be paid the same wages as their male counterparts, they should have the right to vote and drive a car and do everyday people things without hinderance, etc.

But that’s not where gender equality ends. People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of “gender” without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff.

So when someone gets catcalled or threatened or browbeaten, you have to stand up and say NO. And look, I get that’s uncomfortable and confrontational and hard, honestly hard, to do. I’m guilty of not saying anything, of plowing along with my head in the sand and just gushing over my funny pages. But like I said, that’s not enough anymore. We need to have this conversation; we need to call this bullshit behavior out.

Because ignoring the harassment is condoning it. It undermines the severity of the situation. It tells the victims that we care more about their attackers than we do about them. Not to mention, the instances when people flat out tell victims of harassment that they’re exaggerating the facts, or “that’s not what he meant” or “get over it and stop being so emotional.”

And that is fucked up. Seriously fucked up. We need to do better, people. We need to do a lot better.

Let’s be better.

"Conspicuously absent from this list, though, is the most talked about woman in music right now: Lana Del Rey, whose new album Ultraviolence hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts as soon as it was released. She wants nothing to do with any of this discussion. A few weeks ago, she proclaimed in an interview with FADER, “The issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept.”"
One Commercial Perfectly Captures the Sneaky Way We Push Girls Away From Science
Alleged harassment of 11-year-old at Brony con raises troubling questions
"Yet, in just the past year, the Iowa Supreme Court ruled that a woman can be fired if her boss finds her attractive, a New York court decided that unpaid interns can’t sue for sexual harassment, and the Paycheck Fairness Act was defeated by Republicans who claimed women actually prefer lower-paying jobs."
Sorry To Burst Your Masturbatory Comic Bubble (No, I’m Not)
Comics, I kind of hate you right now
Comics, I kind of hate you right now

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

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