Bookoisseur

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I write for Hello Giggles, and tweet frequently as Bookoisseur.
~ Monday, February 11 ~
Permalink Tags: tumblarians librarians publishing wtf
5 notes
~ Tuesday, January 22 ~
Permalink Tags: libraries librarians tumblarians
35 notes
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~ Thursday, December 13 ~
Permalink Tags: lit libraries librarians tumblarians and i just want a card catalog shelf for my kitchen
29 notes
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~ Monday, December 10 ~
Permalink Tags: lit libraries librarians prose books
34 notes
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Permalink Tags: libraries librarians fotzepolitic
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~ Sunday, December 9 ~
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Because kids don’t have a political voice, they have been neglected—and have replace the elderly as the most impoverished age group in our country. Today, 22 percent of children live below the poverty line.

Nicholas Kristof, “Profiting From a Child’s Illiteracy”

22% is a frightening, shameful number.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Tags: Lit education news politics libraries librarians
50 notes
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~ Saturday, December 8 ~
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thelifeguardlibrarian:


When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.
The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.
With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.

The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.

With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

Tags: lit libraries librarians humanitarian aid education international news
68 notes
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~ Tuesday, December 4 ~
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In early days, I tried not to give librarians any trouble, which was where I made my primary mistake. Librarians like to be given trouble; they exist for it, they are geared to it. For the location of a mislaid volume, an uncatalogued item, your good librarian has a ferret’s nose. Give her a scent and she jumps the leash, her eye bright with battle.

Catherine Drinker Bowen.  Adventures of a Biographer, ch. 9. 1959 (via ebookworm)

This is actually totally true. I did some research for my brother at the Library of Congress when he was getting his PhD. Mostly photocopying original sources he couldn’t borrow and that kind of thing. Anyways, one of the documents was missing and not shelved where it was supposed to be. When three librarians went into the back - going back and forth about where it might be - I turned to the guy at the desk and said, “I’m so sorry. This must be such a pain for you guys.”

His response:

"Oh no. They love this. They’re going to be talking about this at lunch and the other librarians will be jealous."

They found the document. They were very proud. 

(Source: libraryaccounts)

Tags: tumblarians libraries librarians
105 notes
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~ Monday, November 26 ~
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Despite Ruin, Library Offers Books and Community

Although public libraries in the Rockaways were badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy, library staff and a mobile bus have helped fulfill their mission to provide useful information.

Despite Ruin, Library Offers Books and Community

Although public libraries in the Rockaways were badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy, library staff and a mobile bus have helped fulfill their mission to provide useful information.

Tags: librarians libraries tumblarians
27 notes
Permalink Tags: libraries librarians academic libraries oxford zach stone
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~ Tuesday, November 20 ~
Permalink Tags: lit libraries librarians uk
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~ Tuesday, November 13 ~
Permalink Tags: lit libraries librarians everylibrary news rally! tumblr twitter
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~ Wednesday, November 7 ~
Permalink Tags: lit libraries librarians education election
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We think because we have words, not the other way around, and the greater our vocabulary, the greater our ability to think conceptually. The first people a dictator puts in jail after a coup are the writers, the teachers, the librarians -because these people are dangerous. They have enough vocabulary to recognize injustice and to speak out loudly about it. Let us have the courage to go on being dangerous people.

Madeleine L’Engle (via sweetnsourflower94)

Yoooooooo WHERE IS THIS FROM?

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)
Tags: librarians dangerous people journals of a dreamer teachers thinking conceptually vocabulary writers Madeleine L’Engle
234 notes
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~ Wednesday, October 31 ~
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The Amazon KOLL experience is undesirable, and so is the library ebook experience. However, libraries have a lot more going for them, and only if their future is completely tied to circulating ebooks will that future be in jeopardy.
Tags: lit libraries librarians tech ebooks publishing
7 notes
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