/tagged/libraries/page/2

saiclibrary:

A small collection of recently added contemporary Iranian art from ARTstor Shared Shelf. We’ve included work by Shadi Ghadirian, Tala Madani, Shirazeh Houshiary and many other artists.  Click here to view a selection of these images in ARTstor (viewable only by SAIC Faculty & Students).

ARTstor Shared Shelf is a library curated digital collection of art images for use by SAIC Faculty and Students that is available as a part of the ARTstor Image collection. Check out the 180,000+ images from the SAIC collection, along with the 1.8 million images in the main ARTstor collection, here (accessible only by SAIC Faculty & Students).

kenyatta:

Brooklyn Public Library

kenyatta:

Brooklyn Public Library

Funding cuts be damned: more than 16,000 public library branches in the U.S. serve 96.4 percent of the population, according to the “State of America’s Libraries Report 2013” by the American Library Association. (The ALA was founded in 1876, the same year the Dewey decimal system was developed.) Public libraries circulated 2.46 billion materials last year, the greatest volume in 10 years. Over this same period, the circulation of children’s book and materials increased by more than 28 percent. Attendance at library-hosted programs for kids hit 60.5 million in 2013. But it’s not just for kids: public libraries nationwide hosted 3.75 million public programs, and attendance for those events, too, is growing, indicating, as the ALA report put it, “an increased demand for these services.” Unsurprisingly, public computers at libraries are also in high demand—and libraries have responded by doubling the number available over the last 10 years.

Lawmaker Wants Library to Lose Funding for Teaching 'Mexicans' English

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Help our work against this ballot action now.

In the past 24 hours we’ve raise $1,125 to support 8 new ads in Lafourche to reach 55k voters. Help spread the word to VOTE NO on Saturday.

‘Let that son of a bitch go back to Mexico. There’s just so many things they’re doing that I don’t agree with. … Them junkies and hippies and food stamps (recipients) and all, they use the library to look at drugs and food stamps (on the Internet). I see them do it.’

The Worst Library Election in the Country is This Saturday | EveryLibrary

Welp.

That’s a quote from Mr. Lindel Toups, chair of the Parish Council in Lafourche, LA, in reference to Mexicans learning English at the Biblioteca Hispana, a Hispanic-language segment of the library system.

THIS is why we need EveryLibrary supporting libraries on the ballot.

Click through to learn more and click here to help now. Click, share, donate—do what you can.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Vote for libraries. Vote for literacy. Vote for equality.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

A Librarian's Response to "What's a Library?"

librarylinknj:

Rita Meade’s response to Michael Rosenblum’s recent piece in the Huffington Post, “What’s a Library?”:

Honestly, I wouldn’t give articles like these a speck of my attention other than to roll my eyes IF the authors hadn’t been given a voice in a widely-read forum. As I have written in previous posts months ago about Terry Deary andTony Lee, it’s less about trying to change their minds and more about not letting those misconceptions of libraries to be sitting out there in the spotlight, unchallenged. It always has been and will always be my opinion that where there is ignorance, people need to counter it with knowledge. And, incidentally, libraries just happen to be great places to gain knowledge.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

shhh! no running in the library!: Today in reasons-why-libraries-and-archives-are-awesome news, I have a story to pass on that I just heard about.

thepinakes:

librarean:

One of my aunts is a sort of freelance historian and archivist who has spent the last several years of her life working primarily on her own to more fully document and record the history of a Native American tribe in our state. Over the years, this has meant…

Ten Awesome Gifts for Librarians

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Oh, just ideas. For librarians you might know and love dearly and want to shower with classy, expensive, bookish presents.

More than 200 libraries close as cuts pick up pace, survey finds

thelifeguardlibrarian:

fotzepolitic:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

More sad news from the UK.

This is the intriguing part: “Visits to libraries declined by six per cent, while borrowings for all books fell apart from children’s fiction, which saw a very small increase.” Which libraries? Where are they located? Is something keeping people from these libraries? Six per cent out of what greater number? Is six per cent a national average? This article not giving us a lot other than, “Libraries are in trouble and here’s some depressing info.” Thanks, but this is a glorified press release. Give us some links and not just the word of whoever obviously just cut and pasted this shit online for the Telegraph.

You have to subscribe to CIPFA for that level of access. It is, indeed, a press release. But an important blip on the news radar worth taking note of.

Because kids don’t have a political voice, they have been neglected—and have replace the elderly as the most impoverished age group in our country. Today, 22 percent of children live below the poverty line.

Nicholas Kristof, “Profiting From a Child’s Illiteracy”

22% is a frightening, shameful number.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(Source: The New York Times, via thelifeguardlibrarian)

thelifeguardlibrarian:


When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.
The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.
With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.

The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.

With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

In early days, I tried not to give librarians any trouble, which was where I made my primary mistake. Librarians like to be given trouble; they exist for it, they are geared to it. For the location of a mislaid volume, an uncatalogued item, your good librarian has a ferret’s nose. Give her a scent and she jumps the leash, her eye bright with battle.

Catherine Drinker Bowen.  Adventures of a Biographer, ch. 9. 1959 (via ebookworm)

This is actually totally true. I did some research for my brother at the Library of Congress when he was getting his PhD. Mostly photocopying original sources he couldn’t borrow and that kind of thing. Anyways, one of the documents was missing and not shelved where it was supposed to be. When three librarians went into the back - going back and forth about where it might be - I turned to the guy at the desk and said, “I’m so sorry. This must be such a pain for you guys.”

His response:

"Oh no. They love this. They’re going to be talking about this at lunch and the other librarians will be jealous."

They found the document. They were very proud. 

(Source: libraryaccounts, via melissarochelle)

saiclibrary:

A small collection of recently added contemporary Iranian art from ARTstor Shared Shelf. We’ve included work by Shadi Ghadirian, Tala Madani, Shirazeh Houshiary and many other artists.  Click here to view a selection of these images in ARTstor (viewable only by SAIC Faculty & Students).

ARTstor Shared Shelf is a library curated digital collection of art images for use by SAIC Faculty and Students that is available as a part of the ARTstor Image collection. Check out the 180,000+ images from the SAIC collection, along with the 1.8 million images in the main ARTstor collection, here (accessible only by SAIC Faculty & Students).

kenyatta:

Brooklyn Public Library

kenyatta:

Brooklyn Public Library

Funding cuts be damned: more than 16,000 public library branches in the U.S. serve 96.4 percent of the population, according to the “State of America’s Libraries Report 2013” by the American Library Association. (The ALA was founded in 1876, the same year the Dewey decimal system was developed.) Public libraries circulated 2.46 billion materials last year, the greatest volume in 10 years. Over this same period, the circulation of children’s book and materials increased by more than 28 percent. Attendance at library-hosted programs for kids hit 60.5 million in 2013. But it’s not just for kids: public libraries nationwide hosted 3.75 million public programs, and attendance for those events, too, is growing, indicating, as the ALA report put it, “an increased demand for these services.” Unsurprisingly, public computers at libraries are also in high demand—and libraries have responded by doubling the number available over the last 10 years.

Lawmaker Wants Library to Lose Funding for Teaching 'Mexicans' English

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Help our work against this ballot action now.

In the past 24 hours we’ve raise $1,125 to support 8 new ads in Lafourche to reach 55k voters. Help spread the word to VOTE NO on Saturday.

‘Let that son of a bitch go back to Mexico. There’s just so many things they’re doing that I don’t agree with. … Them junkies and hippies and food stamps (recipients) and all, they use the library to look at drugs and food stamps (on the Internet). I see them do it.’

The Worst Library Election in the Country is This Saturday | EveryLibrary

Welp.

That’s a quote from Mr. Lindel Toups, chair of the Parish Council in Lafourche, LA, in reference to Mexicans learning English at the Biblioteca Hispana, a Hispanic-language segment of the library system.

THIS is why we need EveryLibrary supporting libraries on the ballot.

Click through to learn more and click here to help now. Click, share, donate—do what you can.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Vote for libraries. Vote for literacy. Vote for equality.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

A Librarian's Response to "What's a Library?"

librarylinknj:

Rita Meade’s response to Michael Rosenblum’s recent piece in the Huffington Post, “What’s a Library?”:

Honestly, I wouldn’t give articles like these a speck of my attention other than to roll my eyes IF the authors hadn’t been given a voice in a widely-read forum. As I have written in previous posts months ago about Terry Deary andTony Lee, it’s less about trying to change their minds and more about not letting those misconceptions of libraries to be sitting out there in the spotlight, unchallenged. It always has been and will always be my opinion that where there is ignorance, people need to counter it with knowledge. And, incidentally, libraries just happen to be great places to gain knowledge.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

shhh! no running in the library!: Today in reasons-why-libraries-and-archives-are-awesome news, I have a story to pass on that I just heard about.

thepinakes:

librarean:

One of my aunts is a sort of freelance historian and archivist who has spent the last several years of her life working primarily on her own to more fully document and record the history of a Native American tribe in our state. Over the years, this has meant…

Ten Awesome Gifts for Librarians

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Oh, just ideas. For librarians you might know and love dearly and want to shower with classy, expensive, bookish presents.

More than 200 libraries close as cuts pick up pace, survey finds

thelifeguardlibrarian:

fotzepolitic:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

More sad news from the UK.

This is the intriguing part: “Visits to libraries declined by six per cent, while borrowings for all books fell apart from children’s fiction, which saw a very small increase.” Which libraries? Where are they located? Is something keeping people from these libraries? Six per cent out of what greater number? Is six per cent a national average? This article not giving us a lot other than, “Libraries are in trouble and here’s some depressing info.” Thanks, but this is a glorified press release. Give us some links and not just the word of whoever obviously just cut and pasted this shit online for the Telegraph.

You have to subscribe to CIPFA for that level of access. It is, indeed, a press release. But an important blip on the news radar worth taking note of.

Because kids don’t have a political voice, they have been neglected—and have replace the elderly as the most impoverished age group in our country. Today, 22 percent of children live below the poverty line.

Nicholas Kristof, “Profiting From a Child’s Illiteracy”

22% is a frightening, shameful number.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(Source: The New York Times, via thelifeguardlibrarian)

thelifeguardlibrarian:


When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.
The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.
With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

When a humanitarian catastrophe occurs, international organizations and governments set up medical outposts, drop emergency food supplies from helicopters, and hand out clothing in disaster zones. Naturally, absolute priority is given to what we call ‘basic needs’: food, water, shelter, and health. While there is no question that organizations and governments must devote the majority of their efforts to promoting the physical well-being of disaster victims, more attention should be given to nourishing the mind as a second measure to help victims cope with catastrophe and move forward.

The fulfillment of basic needs is undoubtedly the first priority in humanitarian situations. Yet from LWB’s work in Haiti, we know that access to books and information resources improves outcomes for displaced persons. Books and expression help sustain intellectual stimulation and promote self-worth and resilience amid crisis. Whether through books, computers, legal assistance or training, access to information and cultural resources empowers individuals and gives them the tools to reconstruct what has been lost. Furthermore, libraries can improve communication within communities and among aid workers by providing phones, community mapping tools, and places for family reunification and community organizing. These types of resources can also play a decisive role in restoring a sense of normality in post-emergency situations.

With the strong belief that books, writing, and learning should not be denied to victims of humanitarian disasters, Libraries Without Borders, through this call to action, seeks to increase awareness about the need for access to information and books in post-disaster situations. Furthermore, LWB calls on international organizations to 1) expand reading, cultural and educational programs, which activate the human spirit and help individuals cope with trauma; and 2) make the provision of access to information and books a priority for international humanitarian relief.

Sign the petition here.

In early days, I tried not to give librarians any trouble, which was where I made my primary mistake. Librarians like to be given trouble; they exist for it, they are geared to it. For the location of a mislaid volume, an uncatalogued item, your good librarian has a ferret’s nose. Give her a scent and she jumps the leash, her eye bright with battle.

Catherine Drinker Bowen.  Adventures of a Biographer, ch. 9. 1959 (via ebookworm)

This is actually totally true. I did some research for my brother at the Library of Congress when he was getting his PhD. Mostly photocopying original sources he couldn’t borrow and that kind of thing. Anyways, one of the documents was missing and not shelved where it was supposed to be. When three librarians went into the back - going back and forth about where it might be - I turned to the guy at the desk and said, “I’m so sorry. This must be such a pain for you guys.”

His response:

"Oh no. They love this. They’re going to be talking about this at lunch and the other librarians will be jealous."

They found the document. They were very proud. 

(Source: libraryaccounts, via melissarochelle)

"Funding cuts be damned: more than 16,000 public library branches in the U.S. serve 96.4 percent of the population, according to the “State of America’s Libraries Report 2013” by the American Library Association. (The ALA was founded in 1876, the same year the Dewey decimal system was developed.) Public libraries circulated 2.46 billion materials last year, the greatest volume in 10 years. Over this same period, the circulation of children’s book and materials increased by more than 28 percent. Attendance at library-hosted programs for kids hit 60.5 million in 2013. But it’s not just for kids: public libraries nationwide hosted 3.75 million public programs, and attendance for those events, too, is growing, indicating, as the ALA report put it, “an increased demand for these services.” Unsurprisingly, public computers at libraries are also in high demand—and libraries have responded by doubling the number available over the last 10 years."
"‘Let that son of a bitch go back to Mexico. There’s just so many things they’re doing that I don’t agree with. … Them junkies and hippies and food stamps (recipients) and all, they use the library to look at drugs and food stamps (on the Internet). I see them do it.’"
"Because kids don’t have a political voice, they have been neglected—and have replace the elderly as the most impoverished age group in our country. Today, 22 percent of children live below the poverty line."
"In early days, I tried not to give librarians any trouble, which was where I made my primary mistake. Librarians like to be given trouble; they exist for it, they are geared to it. For the location of a mislaid volume, an uncatalogued item, your good librarian has a ferret’s nose. Give her a scent and she jumps the leash, her eye bright with battle."

About:

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I have written for Hello Giggles, Huffington Post, The Mary Sue, Buzzfeed, and am currently writing for Nerdist. I tweet frequently as Bookoisseur. I also have a blog at Bookoisseur Writes.

Following:

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