Bookoisseur

I read. I write. I spend all together too much time on the internet. I talk incessantly about books, TV and movies. I write for Hello Giggles, and tweet frequently as Bookoisseur.
~ Friday, April 11 ~
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fuckyeahsouthasia:

perugu—-annam:

Hopefully this makes the Indian elections a little easier to understand. (x)

Tags: politics democracy international politics majority party policymic should see this policymic amazing
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reblogged via uglychu
~ Wednesday, April 9 ~
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theatlantic:

7 Million Afghans Just Dealt a Blow to the Taliban

In a nation more associated with calamity than consensus, the initial results of Saturday’s Afghan presidential election are startling.
Despite Taliban threats to attack polling stations nationwide, the same percentage of Afghans turned out to vote—roughly 58 percent, or 7 million out of 12 million eligible voters—as did Americans in the 2012 U.S. presidential race. Instead of collapsing, Afghan security forces effectively secured the vote. And a leading candidate to replace Hamid Karzai is Ashraf Ghani, a former World Bank technocrat who has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from Columbia University, a Lebanese Christian wife, and an acclaimed book and TED talk entitled “Fixing Failed States.”
"Relative to what we were expecting, it’s very hard to not conclude that this was a real defeat for the Taliban," Andrew Wilder, an American expert on Afghanistan, said in a telephone interview from Kabul on Monday. "And a very good day for the Afghan people."
Two forces that have long destabilized the country—its political elite and its neighbors—could easily squander the initial success. Evidence of large-scale fraud could undermine the legitimacy of the election and exacerbate long-running ethnic divides. And outside powers could continue to fund and arm the Taliban and disgruntled Afghan warlords, as they have for decades.
Read more. [Image: Tim Wimborne/Reuters]


THIS IS AWESOME.

theatlantic:

7 Million Afghans Just Dealt a Blow to the Taliban

In a nation more associated with calamity than consensus, the initial results of Saturday’s Afghan presidential election are startling.

Despite Taliban threats to attack polling stations nationwide, the same percentage of Afghans turned out to vote—roughly 58 percent, or 7 million out of 12 million eligible voters—as did Americans in the 2012 U.S. presidential race. Instead of collapsing, Afghan security forces effectively secured the vote. And a leading candidate to replace Hamid Karzai is Ashraf Ghani, a former World Bank technocrat who has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from Columbia University, a Lebanese Christian wife, and an acclaimed book and TED talk entitled “Fixing Failed States.”

"Relative to what we were expecting, it’s very hard to not conclude that this was a real defeat for the Taliban," Andrew Wilder, an American expert on Afghanistan, said in a telephone interview from Kabul on Monday. "And a very good day for the Afghan people."

Two forces that have long destabilized the country—its political elite and its neighbors—could easily squander the initial success. Evidence of large-scale fraud could undermine the legitimacy of the election and exacerbate long-running ethnic divides. And outside powers could continue to fund and arm the Taliban and disgruntled Afghan warlords, as they have for decades.

Read more. [Image: Tim Wimborne/Reuters]

THIS IS AWESOME.

Tags: voting politics taliban afghanistan afghan election
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reblogged via theatlantic
~ Tuesday, April 1 ~
Permalink Tags: HIMYM speaker of the house boehner john boehner buzzfeed oh dear politics the us budget
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~ Monday, March 17 ~
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That’s how I found myself working a retail job at a sporting goods store—the only steady job I could find after six months of unemployment in a down economy and a news industry in upheaval. In a matter of months, I was broke, depressed, and living on food stamps. I had lost my apartment, and ended up living out of a suitcase in a guest bedroom of an extraordinarily generous family I barely knew. My cash flow consisted of coins from my piggybank and modest sums earned from odd jobs: freelance copy-editing, public relations, coordinating funerals, mowing lawns.
Tags: politics socioeconomics economy job hunt jobs employment
15 notes
~ Tuesday, March 11 ~
Permalink Tags: empathy poverty socioeconomics economy health care access to care access to healthcare affordable health care American Affordable Care Act dental care Paul Ryan politics
112 notes
~ Friday, February 7 ~
Permalink Tags: politics american politics
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reblogged via laughterkey
~ Monday, January 6 ~
Permalink Tags: politics liz cheney wyoming american politics
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reblogged via shortformblog
~ Saturday, January 4 ~
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globalvoices:

Here are three conditions that civil societies in these war-torn countries have identified in order to start the reconstruction of their political systems.
3 Suggestions for Good Governance in the Central African Republic, Madagascar and Mali

globalvoices:

Here are three conditions that civil societies in these war-torn countries have identified in order to start the reconstruction of their political systems.

3 Suggestions for Good Governance in the Central African Republic, Madagascar and Mali

Tags: Africa politics
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reblogged via globalvoices
~ Saturday, December 28 ~
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An emergency federal program that acts as a lifeline for 1.3 million jobless workers will end on Saturday, drastically curtailing government support for the long-term unemployed and setting the stage for a major political fight in the new year.

The program, in place since the recession started in 2008, provides up to 47 weeks of supplemental unemployment insurance payments to jobless people looking for work. Its expiration is expected to have far-reaching ramifications for the economy, cutting job growth by about 300,000 positions next year and pushing hundreds of thousands of households below the poverty line.

An extension of the unemployment program did not make it into the two-year budget deal that was passed just before Congress left on its winter recess. When the federal program expires, just one in four unemployed Americans will receive jobless benefits — the smallest proportion in half a century.

“I really depend on unemployment,” said David Davis of Chantilly, Va., adding that the $1,600 a month he receives is helping keep him afloat while he interviews for new positions. “I’ve got a résumé that knocks your socks off. The reason for this long period of unemployment is that the work just isn’t there.”

At one point, Mr. Davis, 68, made more than $100,000 a year as an information technology expert and web designer. He is now living on ramen noodles and $140 he counted out from his change jar. Since being laid off over the summer, he has missed mortgage payments, forcing him to take out a reverse mortgage on his home. He sold his car and got a late-1990s model Ford Taurus, and is looking to cut his utility and cellphone bills. Soon, he might start taking Social Security.

“It’s very stressful,” Mr. Davis said. “At least I’ve had the ability to maneuver my finances so I don’t wind up homeless. That’s one goal, to avoid living on the street or in my car.”

Democrats on Capitol Hill are pushing for an extension of the program, though the constrained fiscal environment makes its reinstatement somewhat less likely, aides said. Members of the Republican leadership have indicated that they might be willing to extend the benefits, but only if Democrats offset the new spending with other cuts.

On Friday morning, President Obama called Senator Jack Reed, Democrat of Rhode Island, and Senator Dean Heller, Republican of Nevada, to extend his support for their proposal to extend emergency unemployment benefits for three months.

“The president said his administration would, as it has for several weeks now, push Congress to act promptly and in bipartisan fashion to address this urgent economic priority,” said Josh Earnest, a White House spokesman.

As the last payments are distributed, Democrats have initiated a campaign aimed at shaming Republicans — particularly those in leadership and in swing districts — for letting the program expire over the holiday season.

“I don’t know if our colleagues who have opposed passing the unemployment-insurance legislation know or care about the impact on families,” said Nancy Pelosi of California, the House minority leader. “The impact is very, very strong. It hurts the dignity of a family, of a worker.”

Americans United for Change, a liberal group, is running an advertisement on cable television stations. “You know who had a Merry Christmas? The richest 1 percent, that’s who. Republicans in Congress made sure of that, protecting billions in taxpayer giveaways,” it says. “For those facing tough times? Republicans stripped 1.3 million Americans of jobless benefits — folks who want to work, but cannot find a job — kicking them to the curb during Christmas.”

Tags: unemployment news GOP republicans politics socioeconomics economics recession job hunt
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reblogged via inothernews
~ Sunday, December 22 ~
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ohmydarlinbabies:

5and10inwoolworth:

If she runs, she has my vote.

Love her.

(Source: hillarydiane)

Tags: Hillary Clinton politics role models
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reblogged via donut-panic-deactivated20131229
~ Friday, December 20 ~
Permalink Tags: TW: rape abortion mother jones politics american politics journalism media 2013 in review
169 notes
~ Thursday, December 12 ~
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8 Photos You Didn’t See From Obama’s Trip to South Africa

Two things were lost amid the nonsensical partisan wrangling. First, the furor shamefully overshadowed the memorial service itself, and the heartfelt messages that were delivered by Mandela’s family and colleagues. Second, such outcries overlook the close quarters in which our Democratic and Republican politicians actually live and work.

Tags: Obama Bush michelle obama hillary clinton Laura Bush politics political message political manipulation disinformation media matters for america mandela nelson mandela south africa photography
26 notes
~ Sunday, December 8 ~
Permalink Tags: politics political donations funding elections
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reblogged via ruckawriter
~ Thursday, December 5 ~
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From Huffington Post
Iran’s new president, Hassan Rouhani, may have pledged to promote women’s rights and recently nominated a female vice president. But, if a striking image captured during Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif’s introduction is any indication, Iran still has a long way to go when it comes to gender equality.
In the photo taken earlier this month, female journalists sit on the floor and take notes during the inauguration. They are surrounded by men, many of whom are seated in chairs.
"Shameful," Iranian journalist Reza Asadi commented on Twitter, while another Iran-based user wrote: “No. No. No. Women’s place is NOT on the floor.”
As blog Iran Watching notes, maybe the female reporters voluntarily sat there to get a better view of Zarif and Rouhani during their speeches. But as Al-Monitor’s Iran Pulse editor Arash Karami wondered on Twitter, why didn’t any of the seated men offer their chair?
The country has made some strides this week. On Tuesday, Iranian media reported that Zarif will appoint women to the positions of ambassador and foreign ministry spokesperson — a first for the Islamic republic, NDTV notes.
However, based on the photos from the foreign minister’s inauguration, it seems Rouhani still has his work cut out for him. 

From Huffington Post

Iran’s new president, Hassan Rouhani, may have pledged to promote women’s rights and recently nominated a female vice president. But, if a striking image captured during Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif’s introduction is any indication, Iran still has a long way to go when it comes to gender equality.

In the photo taken earlier this month, female journalists sit on the floor and take notes during the inauguration. They are surrounded by men, many of whom are seated in chairs.

"Shameful," Iranian journalist Reza Asadi commented on Twitter, while another Iran-based user wrote: “No. No. No. Women’s place is NOT on the floor.”

As blog Iran Watching notes, maybe the female reporters voluntarily sat there to get a better view of Zarif and Rouhani during their speeches. But as Al-Monitor’s Iran Pulse editor Arash Karami wondered on Twitter, why didn’t any of the seated men offer their chair?

The country has made some strides this week. On Tuesday, Iranian media reported that Zarif will appoint women to the positions of ambassador and foreign ministry spokesperson — a first for the Islamic republic, NDTV notes.

However, based on the photos from the foreign minister’s inauguration, it seems Rouhani still has his work cut out for him. 

Tags: women journalism iran women in politics women's rights international women's rights culture politics women in journalism huffington post twitter
16 notes
~ Wednesday, December 4 ~
Permalink Tags: war politics podcasts nerdist oliver stone government conspiracy theories story telling jfk